Project Title

Experimental Food Explorations: Increasing the Antioxidant Content of a Reese’s Dessert Cup has Potential for Improved Dietary Intake in Cancer Patients

Authors' Affiliations

Julianne Truelove, Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Nia Johnson, Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Culp Ballroom

Start Date

4-7-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2022 12:00 PM

Poster Number

94

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Sciences

Rehabilitative Health Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Mary Andreae

Additional Sponsors

Kristy L Thomas Rehabilitative Health Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science1 Department of Biomedical Science, Quillen College of Medicine2 ; East Tennessee State University, Johnson City. W. Andrew Clark PhD, RD, LDN1, Rehabilitative Health Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science1 Department of Biomedical Science, Quillen College of Medicine2 ; East Tennessee State University, Johnson City.

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Non-Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Project's Category

Cancer or Carcinogenesis, Nutrition Disorders

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Introduction: Oxidative stress is a disruption in the balance of free radicals and antioxidants. Cancer patients have very high levels of oxidative stress due to radiation and chemotherapy. This imbalance from the oxidative stress can stimulate cancerous growth, as well abnormal cellular growth. Oxidative stress is due, in part, to lipid per-oxidation from cancer treatments, generating electrophilic aldehydes that attack abnormal, as well as healthy cells. A way to combat the amount of oxidative stress to protect healthy cells is to increase antioxidant defenses through the diet. Antioxidants are chemicals that help stop free radical formation and prevent cell damage. Traditional high antioxidant foods include fruits, vegetables, low saturated- fats, and high fiber foods. During cancer treatments the patient generally has a decreased sense of appetite, as nausea and emesis are common side effects. A “treat” food, like a Reese’s peanut butter cup might be able to stimulate a cancer patient’s appetite, and thus meeting some of their much-needed dietary nutrients. By transforming this popular dessert treat into something that could aid with oxidative stress may be beneficial to this population. The objective of this study was to create an appetizing and nutritionally functional Reese’s peanut butter cup alternative with enhanced antioxidants. Methods: A common Reese’s cup recipe was taken and adapted for more nutrient rich ingredients. The milk chocolate of the original control recipe for Reese's cup was substituted in the variant dessert cup with dark chocolate cacao nibs. The peanut butter was replaced by tahini, and the sugar was replaced by dates in the control and variant, respectively. Proximate analyses for the nutritional content of both dessert cups was collected. Analyses included: Total cal/g using bomb calorimetry, antioxidant potential by a ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), Soxhlet for lipid determination, kjeldahl for protein determination, and fiber via a ANKOM Fiber Analyzer. Results: Calories for the control yielded 5961 cal/g, and the variant, 6007.5 cal/g. The absorbance data for FRAP was 2.9996 and 4.5426, for the control and variant respectively. Lipid content was 46.65% for the control (% Ether Extract (Crude Fat)) and 46.9% for the variant (% Ether Extract (Crude Fat)). Protein content for the control was 6.25%, and 9.65% for the variant. Analysis for dietary fiber found insoluble dietary fiber to be 26.6% and soluble dietary fiber 0% for the control. The variant’s insoluble dietary fiber content was 21.4% and soluble dietary fiber 8.7%. Finally, dry matter was 98.6% for the control, and 97.4% for the variant. Conclusion: Data collected showed the greatest differences between antioxidants, fiber, and protein, with the variant having the highest percent content of each nutrient. This research has shown that a dessert alternative can support patients undergoing cancer therapies through the provision of necessary calories and antioxidants. Future research is needed to compare the specific fatty acid content of these two products

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

Experimental Food Explorations: Increasing the Antioxidant Content of a Reese’s Dessert Cup has Potential for Improved Dietary Intake in Cancer Patients

Culp Ballroom

Introduction: Oxidative stress is a disruption in the balance of free radicals and antioxidants. Cancer patients have very high levels of oxidative stress due to radiation and chemotherapy. This imbalance from the oxidative stress can stimulate cancerous growth, as well abnormal cellular growth. Oxidative stress is due, in part, to lipid per-oxidation from cancer treatments, generating electrophilic aldehydes that attack abnormal, as well as healthy cells. A way to combat the amount of oxidative stress to protect healthy cells is to increase antioxidant defenses through the diet. Antioxidants are chemicals that help stop free radical formation and prevent cell damage. Traditional high antioxidant foods include fruits, vegetables, low saturated- fats, and high fiber foods. During cancer treatments the patient generally has a decreased sense of appetite, as nausea and emesis are common side effects. A “treat” food, like a Reese’s peanut butter cup might be able to stimulate a cancer patient’s appetite, and thus meeting some of their much-needed dietary nutrients. By transforming this popular dessert treat into something that could aid with oxidative stress may be beneficial to this population. The objective of this study was to create an appetizing and nutritionally functional Reese’s peanut butter cup alternative with enhanced antioxidants. Methods: A common Reese’s cup recipe was taken and adapted for more nutrient rich ingredients. The milk chocolate of the original control recipe for Reese's cup was substituted in the variant dessert cup with dark chocolate cacao nibs. The peanut butter was replaced by tahini, and the sugar was replaced by dates in the control and variant, respectively. Proximate analyses for the nutritional content of both dessert cups was collected. Analyses included: Total cal/g using bomb calorimetry, antioxidant potential by a ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), Soxhlet for lipid determination, kjeldahl for protein determination, and fiber via a ANKOM Fiber Analyzer. Results: Calories for the control yielded 5961 cal/g, and the variant, 6007.5 cal/g. The absorbance data for FRAP was 2.9996 and 4.5426, for the control and variant respectively. Lipid content was 46.65% for the control (% Ether Extract (Crude Fat)) and 46.9% for the variant (% Ether Extract (Crude Fat)). Protein content for the control was 6.25%, and 9.65% for the variant. Analysis for dietary fiber found insoluble dietary fiber to be 26.6% and soluble dietary fiber 0% for the control. The variant’s insoluble dietary fiber content was 21.4% and soluble dietary fiber 8.7%. Finally, dry matter was 98.6% for the control, and 97.4% for the variant. Conclusion: Data collected showed the greatest differences between antioxidants, fiber, and protein, with the variant having the highest percent content of each nutrient. This research has shown that a dessert alternative can support patients undergoing cancer therapies through the provision of necessary calories and antioxidants. Future research is needed to compare the specific fatty acid content of these two products