Honors Program

Midway Honors

Date of Award

12-2017

Thesis Professor(s)

Craig Wassinger

Thesis Professor Department

Physical Therapy

Thesis Reader(s)

Craig Wassinger, Michael Bourassa, Beatrice Owens

Abstract

Background: Emerging evidence suggests that aerobic exercise and conditioned pain modulation may be advocated in treating patients with musculoskeletal pain. The effects of lower extremity aerobic exercise and conditioned pain modulation on evoked shoulder pain are not known.

Purpose: To determine the acute effects of lower extremity aerobic exercise and conditioned pain modulation on outcomes of evoked shoulder pain from pain pressure threshold measurements.

Study Design: Repeated measures.

Methods: Thirty (30) healthy volunteers were tested over the course of two sessions. Session 1 consisted of collecting pain pressure threshold measurements over the infraspinatus before and immediately following a conditioned pain modulation with cool water. Session 2 consisted of collecting pain pressure threshold measurements over the infraspinatus before and immediately following a bout of lower extremity aerobic exercise on a recumbent stepper apparatus.

Results: Pain pressure threshold was not significantly influenced by the conditioned pain modulation using cool water (p=0.725). Pain pressure threshold was significantly increased immediately following the lower extremity exercise session (P<0.001).

Conclusion: Conditioned pain modulation with cool water did not produce any significant changes in pain pressure threshold. Lower extremity aerobic exercise acutely increased pain pressure threshold in participants with experimentally induced shoulder pain. Physical therapists may consider lower extremity aerobic exercise to produce short-term hypoalgesic effects and facilitate the application of more active interventions.

Publisher

East Tennessee State University

Document Type

Honors Thesis - Open Access

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.