Honors Program

Midway Honors

Date of Award

5-2010

Thesis Professor(s)

James Fox

Thesis Professor Department

Human Development and Learning

Abstract

This study analyzed the relationship between young children’s language development and behavior problem ratings from their teachers and parents. It examined this relation to determine to what extent children’s language delays are associated with clinically significant levels of behavior problems, the degree to which the level of language delay is related to behavior problem ratings by both teachers and parents, and the degree of correlation between teachers’ and parents’ ratings of behavior. Participants were teachers and parents of children between two to five years of age in Washington County early intervention classrooms. Parents and teachers of the children returned Informed Consent Documents and were asked to complete the appropriate version of the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1 ½ to 5 (CBCL 1 ½ -5) about their student or child (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000). A measure of language development from the Battelle Developmental Inventory was obtained from the child’s existing language assessment data in his or her school record (Newborg, Stock,Wnek,Guidubaldi, & Svinicki, 1984). The expressive and receptive language age equivalent score from the Commjunication sub-test of the Battelle Developmental Inventory was analyzed for each child (Newborg, Stock,Wnek,Guidubaldi, & Svinicki, 1984). Low negative correlations were found between the Total Behavior Problem score and Receptive Language, as well as between Total External Behavior Problem score and Receptive Language. Teachers and parents showed moderate to high agreement on child behavior ratings. Implications for understanding the reciprocal role of language and behavior development and for future research were discussed.

Document Type

Honors Thesis - Open Access

Copyright

Copyright by the authors.

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