Title

Gender Differences in the Associations of Early Onset Poly Tobacco and Drug Use Prior to Age 18 With the Prevalence of Adult Bronchitis in the United States

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2020

Description

Purpose: We investigated the associations of early onset polysubstance use prior to age 18 with the prevalence of bronchitis among U.S. adults and tested whether the associations differ by gender. Methods: A total of 77,950 adults, of them 2,653 with bronchitis in the past year, were from the combined 2013 and 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data. The variable cluster analysis was used to classify nine variables about substance use prior to age 18 (cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines, ecstasy, and phencyclidine). Weighted multivariate logistic regression analysis (MLR) was used to examine the associations with bronchitis. Results: Nine variables were divided into two clusters: early onset poly tobacco use (three tobacco use variables) and early onset poly drug use (six drug use variables). The overall prevalence of bronchitis was 3.8% (5.1% for females and 2.3% for males). MLR analysis showed that being female, elderly (ages 65 and above), obese, and early onset poly tobacco use were associated with increased odds of bronchitis (p < 0.05). Gender-stratified analyses showed that early-onset poly tobacco use was significantly associated with bronchitis only in males, whereas early onset poly drug use was associated with bronchitis only in females. Moreover, obesity and tobacco use in the past year revealed associations with bronchitis regardless of gender. Conclusions: Obesity, early onset poly tobacco use prior to age 18, and tobacco use in the past year were positively associated with bronchitis; furthermore, the associations of early onset polysubstance use with bronchitis differed by gender, which indicated that gender differences should be considered in developing effective prevention strategies.

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