Title

Potentiation Following Ballistic and Nonballistic Complexes: The Effect of Strength Level

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2016

Description

The purpose of this study was to compare the temporal profile of strong and weak subjects during ballistic and nonballistic potentiation complexes. Eight strong (relative back squat = 2.1 ± 0.1 times body mass) and 8 weak (relative back squat = 1.6 ± 0.2 times body mass) males performed squat jumps immediately and every minute up to 10 minutes following potentiation complexes that included ballistic or nonballistic concentric-only half-squat (COHS) performed at 90% of their 1 repetition maximum COHS. Jump height (JH) and allometrically scaled peak power (PPa) were compared using a series of 2 × 12 repeated measures analyses of variance. No statistically significant strength level main effects for JH (p = 0.442) or PPa (p = 0.078) existed during the ballistic condition. In contrast, statistically significant main effects for time existed for both JH (p = 0.014) and PPa (p < 0.001); however, no statistically significant pairwise comparisons were present (p > 0.05). Statistically significant strength level main effects existed for PPa (p = 0.039) but not for JH (p = 0.137) during the nonballistic condition. Post hoc analysis revealed that the strong subjects produced statistically greater PPa than the weaker subjects (p = 0.039). Statistically significant time main effects existed for time existed for PPa (p = 0.015), but not for JH (p = 0.178). No statistically significant strength level × time interaction effects for JH (p = 0.319) or PPa (p = 0.203) were present for the ballistic or nonballistic conditions. Practical significance indicated by effect sizes and the relationships between maximum potentiation and relative strength suggest that stronger subjects potentiate earlier and to a greater extent than weaker subjects during ballistic and nonballistic potentiation complexes.

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