Title

Lower Extremity Explosive Strength Relates to Swing Velocity Performances in NCAA Division-I Softball Athletes

Document Type

Presentation

Publication Date

2-1-2017

Description

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between bat swing velocity and lower extremity strength and power in NCAA Division-I softball athletes. METHODS: Twenty-nine softball athletes (age = 19.8 ± 1.3 years, height = 167.9 ± 6.8 cm, mass = 76.4 ± 18.1 kg) participated in the study. Athletes were tested on unloaded and loaded (20kg) squat and countermovement jump peak force, peak power, and jump height performed on a force platform sampling at 1000Hz. During practice, athletes were tested on swing velocity using a timing gate system. Pearson-product moment zero-order correlations were calculated between bat swing velocity and lower extremity strength and power. Statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. RESULTS: Moderate to strong relationships were observed between swing velocity and peak force at all conditions: SJ 0kg (r= 0.51, p= 0.005), SJ 20kg (r= 0.50, p= 0.006), CMJ 0kg (r= 0.44, p= 0.016), CMJ 20kg (r= 0.43, p= 0.022). Additionally, relationships were observed between swing velocity and peak power at all conditions: SJ 0kg (r= 0.45, p= 0.015), SJ 20kg (r= 0.40, p= 0.031), CMJ 0kg (r= 0.53, p= 0.003), CMJ 20kg (r= 0.45, p= 0.015). No statistically significant relationships were observed between swing velocity and jump height. CONCLUSIONS: Swing velocity was related to lower extremity force and power variables. Considering the known effects of strength training on lower extremity strength and power production, these results provide background for inclusion of lower extremity strength training for the development of swing velocity in NCAA Division-I softball athletes.

Location

Greenville, SC

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