Authors' Affiliations

Yan Cao, Center for Nursing Research, College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Sheryl Strasser, Department of Health Promotion & Behavior, Georgia State University School of Public Health, Atlanta, USA

Location

D.P. Culp Center Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2024 9:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2024 11:30 AM

Poster Number

34

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Shimin Zheng

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Biostatistics and Epidemiology

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Presentation Category

Health

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Overweight and obesity, categorized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 25 and ≥ 30 kg/m², respectively, pose substantial threats to both individual health and societal welfare. They elevate the likelihood of chronic ailments like cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes, and various cancers. Tennessee, mirroring many other U.S. states, grapples with pronounced challenges concerning overweight and obesity, as evidenced by escalating prevalence rates documented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This study seeks to discern risk factors by comparing Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BFRSS) data from Tennessee with data from non-Tennessee regions. The logistic regression analysis was utilized to investigate the association between obesity and various risk factors in Tennessee (TN) and non-Tennessee (non-TN) populations respectively, with obesity as the dependent variable, adjusting for various factors. The dataset from BRFSS spanning 2014-2022 comprised a total of 3,923,294 participants. Across both Tennessee and non-Tennessee populations, males demonstrated reduced odds of obesity compared to females, with respective odds ratios (OR) of 0.94 and 0.98. Individuals aged 35-64 exhibited higher odds of obesity compared to those aged 18 to 24 in both TN and Non-TN populations. Additionally, as income levels rose, the likelihood of obesity consistently decreased across both groups. In the TN population, engaging in exercise was linked to a 35% reduction in obesity odds, while in the non-TN population, this reduction was 43%. Moreover, TN individuals reporting alcohol consumption showed 34% lower odds of obesity, whereas non-TN individuals exhibited 20% lower odds. Higher educational attainment was associated with decreased odds of obesity in both TN and non-TN populations. However, the association between smoking or Hispanic ethnicity and obesity in TN was not significant, while in non-TN regions, these associations were highly significant. This study highlights significant gender disparities, age-related risks, socioeconomic influences, and lifestyle factors associated with obesity in both TN and non-TN populations. Findings underscore the importance of targeted interventions addressing these determinants to prevent the rising prevalence of obesity and improve public health outcomes. By addressing socioeconomic inequalities, promoting physical activity, and enhancing health literacy, policymakers and healthcare practitioners can work towards creating healthier communities and reducing the burden of obesity-related chronic diseases.

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Apr 5th, 9:00 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

Prevalence and risk factors of obesity/overweight in Tennessee and non-Tennessee, using Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data from 2014-2022

D.P. Culp Center Ballroom

Overweight and obesity, categorized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 25 and ≥ 30 kg/m², respectively, pose substantial threats to both individual health and societal welfare. They elevate the likelihood of chronic ailments like cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes, and various cancers. Tennessee, mirroring many other U.S. states, grapples with pronounced challenges concerning overweight and obesity, as evidenced by escalating prevalence rates documented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This study seeks to discern risk factors by comparing Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BFRSS) data from Tennessee with data from non-Tennessee regions. The logistic regression analysis was utilized to investigate the association between obesity and various risk factors in Tennessee (TN) and non-Tennessee (non-TN) populations respectively, with obesity as the dependent variable, adjusting for various factors. The dataset from BRFSS spanning 2014-2022 comprised a total of 3,923,294 participants. Across both Tennessee and non-Tennessee populations, males demonstrated reduced odds of obesity compared to females, with respective odds ratios (OR) of 0.94 and 0.98. Individuals aged 35-64 exhibited higher odds of obesity compared to those aged 18 to 24 in both TN and Non-TN populations. Additionally, as income levels rose, the likelihood of obesity consistently decreased across both groups. In the TN population, engaging in exercise was linked to a 35% reduction in obesity odds, while in the non-TN population, this reduction was 43%. Moreover, TN individuals reporting alcohol consumption showed 34% lower odds of obesity, whereas non-TN individuals exhibited 20% lower odds. Higher educational attainment was associated with decreased odds of obesity in both TN and non-TN populations. However, the association between smoking or Hispanic ethnicity and obesity in TN was not significant, while in non-TN regions, these associations were highly significant. This study highlights significant gender disparities, age-related risks, socioeconomic influences, and lifestyle factors associated with obesity in both TN and non-TN populations. Findings underscore the importance of targeted interventions addressing these determinants to prevent the rising prevalence of obesity and improve public health outcomes. By addressing socioeconomic inequalities, promoting physical activity, and enhancing health literacy, policymakers and healthcare practitioners can work towards creating healthier communities and reducing the burden of obesity-related chronic diseases.