Adsorption of nitrates from contaminated water on amino-modified porous materials

Authors' Affiliations

Ray Mohseni, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

D.P. Culp Center Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2024 9:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2024 11:30 AM

Poster Number

133

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Aleksey Vasiliev

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Chemistry

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Presentation Category

Science, Technology and Engineering

Abstract or Artist's Statement

This study addresses the critical environmental issue of elevated nitrate levels in water bodies, primarily due to excessive use of nitrogenous fertilizers and improper waste disposal, leading to detrimental effects like eutrophication and health hazards such as blue-baby syndrome. Focusing on the necessity to reduce nitrate concentrations in polluted water to permissible levels, our research explores the effectiveness of hybrid materials in nitrate adsorption. We synthesized and studied nine distinct adsorbents using two processes: grafting and sol-gel techniques. This involved applying amino-containing molecules (such as bis[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]amine, 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, N-[3 (trimethoxysilyl)propyl]aniline, and benzylamine) onto silica gel surfaces, followed by acidification with HCl in dioxane solution to transform surface amino groups into ammonium moieties. The produced mesoporous adsorbents with high surface area were examined for their structural and chemical properties using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, porosimetry and dynamic light scattering. Batch adsorption tests proved the high nitrate adsorption capacities of these adsorbents. Surfactant-free, sol-gel synthesized adsorbent demonstrated the highest efficiency attributed to its abundant amino group content. Additionally, the study of the temperature dependence of nitrate adsorption revealed its optimal removal at ambient temperature and a decrease of adsorption capacity at higher temperatures. This research contributes significantly to the development of efficient methods for nitrate removal from water, presenting a promising approach for environmental remediation.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 9:00 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

Adsorption of nitrates from contaminated water on amino-modified porous materials

D.P. Culp Center Ballroom

This study addresses the critical environmental issue of elevated nitrate levels in water bodies, primarily due to excessive use of nitrogenous fertilizers and improper waste disposal, leading to detrimental effects like eutrophication and health hazards such as blue-baby syndrome. Focusing on the necessity to reduce nitrate concentrations in polluted water to permissible levels, our research explores the effectiveness of hybrid materials in nitrate adsorption. We synthesized and studied nine distinct adsorbents using two processes: grafting and sol-gel techniques. This involved applying amino-containing molecules (such as bis[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]amine, 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, N-[3 (trimethoxysilyl)propyl]aniline, and benzylamine) onto silica gel surfaces, followed by acidification with HCl in dioxane solution to transform surface amino groups into ammonium moieties. The produced mesoporous adsorbents with high surface area were examined for their structural and chemical properties using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, porosimetry and dynamic light scattering. Batch adsorption tests proved the high nitrate adsorption capacities of these adsorbents. Surfactant-free, sol-gel synthesized adsorbent demonstrated the highest efficiency attributed to its abundant amino group content. Additionally, the study of the temperature dependence of nitrate adsorption revealed its optimal removal at ambient temperature and a decrease of adsorption capacity at higher temperatures. This research contributes significantly to the development of efficient methods for nitrate removal from water, presenting a promising approach for environmental remediation.