Project Title

Classifying Quenching Galaxies: Comparing Methods

Authors' Affiliations

Joseph Hewa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Beverly Smith, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Mark Giroux, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Culp Ballroom

Start Date

4-7-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2022 12:00 PM

Poster Number

102

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Physics & Astronomy

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Beverly Smith

Additional Sponsors

Mark Giroux

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Project's Category

Astronomy

Abstract or Artist's Statement

This project is the result of a summer long internship I worked on with Dr. Beverly Smith in the ETSU Department of Physics and Astronomy. It was completed with the support of a grant from the NASA Tennessee Space Grant Consortium. Quenching galaxies are galaxies that are rapidly evolving from strongly star forming systems to galaxies with mostly old stars and low star formation rates. When identifying quenching galaxies, there are several methods in common use. Furthermore, there are several ways astronomers estimate the Star Formation Rate (SFR), in Solar Masses per year, and Stellar Mass (M*), in Solar Masses, of galaxies. For a large sample of galaxies, we used 6 derivations of M* and 4 for SFR, plotting them against each other for comparison. We also calculated and compared the specific SFR (sSFR), equal to SFR/M*, and compared the different methods of defining quenched galaxies. Finally, we divided up these plots by classification, Red Sequence/Green Valley/Blue Cloud, and different values of log (SFR) *

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

Classifying Quenching Galaxies: Comparing Methods

Culp Ballroom

This project is the result of a summer long internship I worked on with Dr. Beverly Smith in the ETSU Department of Physics and Astronomy. It was completed with the support of a grant from the NASA Tennessee Space Grant Consortium. Quenching galaxies are galaxies that are rapidly evolving from strongly star forming systems to galaxies with mostly old stars and low star formation rates. When identifying quenching galaxies, there are several methods in common use. Furthermore, there are several ways astronomers estimate the Star Formation Rate (SFR), in Solar Masses per year, and Stellar Mass (M*), in Solar Masses, of galaxies. For a large sample of galaxies, we used 6 derivations of M* and 4 for SFR, plotting them against each other for comparison. We also calculated and compared the specific SFR (sSFR), equal to SFR/M*, and compared the different methods of defining quenched galaxies. Finally, we divided up these plots by classification, Red Sequence/Green Valley/Blue Cloud, and different values of log (SFR) *