Project Title

Olfactory Dysfunction in SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Benefits of Including Smell Tests in COVID-19 Patients

Authors' Affiliations

Dr. Cuihong Jia, Department of Biomedical Sciences, PO Box 70582, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Dr. Diego Rodriguez-Gil, Department of Biomedical Sciences, PO Box 70582, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Dalton Caviness, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614

Location

Culp Ballroom

Start Date

4-7-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2022 12:00 PM

Poster Number

55

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Biomedical Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Cuihong Jia

Additional Sponsors

Dr. Diego Rodriguez-Gil

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Project's Category

Viral Infections

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Loss of olfactory function can readily be overlooked in a clinical setting. In most cases, symptomatic patients recover the sense of smell without any treatment due to the intrinsic neuroregenerative capacity in adult olfactory epithelium. The substantial prevalence of olfactory dysfunction following viral infection of the respiratory system leads many clinicians to consider this physical dysfunction as a subjective symptom rather than a diagnostic and pathologic sign amenable to analysis. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind olfactory dysfunction is expected to increase its clinical importance. Through analyzation of human and mouse specimens, one is able to gain insight into viral-induced olfactory dysfunction on a pathophysiologic level. These murine and human models provide a better understanding of mechanisms and reveal potential therapeutic targets. This is becoming increasingly useful considering the high prevalence of olfactory loss among COVID-19 patients. Here, we discuss the process of olfactory loss following viral infection, the possible mechanism of sudden olfactory dysfunction in COVID-19 infection, the possible benefits of clinical smell tests in COVID-19 patients, and a potentially overlooked consequence on olfactory function using dexamethasone in treating COVID-19 patients. We suggest that including smell tests in COVID-19 patients and studying the mechanism underlying olfactory dysfunction could provide potential strategy to prevent COVID-19 infection and spread and reveal potential therapeutic intervention to restore sense of smell. There are 18 sources used for this miniature literature review. All of our resources were chosen for up-to-date information regarding COVID-19 and it’s effect on the olfactory system. The sources were either found during a large PubMed search or recommendations sent from professors. This article just recently underwent a revision. After revision, our conclusions that smell tests would be beneficial in a clinical setting to prevent the spread and reveal therapeutic targets have been supported by the articles listed. This has been submitted and accepted by a peer-reviewed journal.

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

Olfactory Dysfunction in SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Benefits of Including Smell Tests in COVID-19 Patients

Culp Ballroom

Loss of olfactory function can readily be overlooked in a clinical setting. In most cases, symptomatic patients recover the sense of smell without any treatment due to the intrinsic neuroregenerative capacity in adult olfactory epithelium. The substantial prevalence of olfactory dysfunction following viral infection of the respiratory system leads many clinicians to consider this physical dysfunction as a subjective symptom rather than a diagnostic and pathologic sign amenable to analysis. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind olfactory dysfunction is expected to increase its clinical importance. Through analyzation of human and mouse specimens, one is able to gain insight into viral-induced olfactory dysfunction on a pathophysiologic level. These murine and human models provide a better understanding of mechanisms and reveal potential therapeutic targets. This is becoming increasingly useful considering the high prevalence of olfactory loss among COVID-19 patients. Here, we discuss the process of olfactory loss following viral infection, the possible mechanism of sudden olfactory dysfunction in COVID-19 infection, the possible benefits of clinical smell tests in COVID-19 patients, and a potentially overlooked consequence on olfactory function using dexamethasone in treating COVID-19 patients. We suggest that including smell tests in COVID-19 patients and studying the mechanism underlying olfactory dysfunction could provide potential strategy to prevent COVID-19 infection and spread and reveal potential therapeutic intervention to restore sense of smell. There are 18 sources used for this miniature literature review. All of our resources were chosen for up-to-date information regarding COVID-19 and it’s effect on the olfactory system. The sources were either found during a large PubMed search or recommendations sent from professors. This article just recently underwent a revision. After revision, our conclusions that smell tests would be beneficial in a clinical setting to prevent the spread and reveal therapeutic targets have been supported by the articles listed. This has been submitted and accepted by a peer-reviewed journal.