Project Title

Fecal Fermentation Profile, Nutrient Proximate Analysis and Well-being of Aerobic versus Anaerobically Trained Female Athletes

Authors' Affiliations

Lindsey Stallworth, Department of Rehabilitative Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Anna K Whitlock, Department of Rehabilitative Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Sonja J Lafollette, Department of Biological Science, College of Arts and Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Laiken Lewis, Department of Biological Science, College of Arts and Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Kristy Thomas, Department of Rehabilitative Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, Department of Biomedical Science, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Amy E Wahlquist, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Clemmer College of Education Dr. W. Andrew Clark, Department of Rehabilitative Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, Department of Biomedical Science, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Mary C. Andreae, Department of Rehabilitative Science, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, Department of Biomedical Science, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Dr. Michael Stone, Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Culp Ballroom

Start Date

4-7-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2022 12:00 PM

Poster Number

121

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Sciences

Department of Health and Rehabilitative Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

William Clark

Additional Sponsors

Dr. W. Andrew Clark

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Project's Category

Womens Health

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Fecal Fermentation Profile, Nutrient Proximate Analysis and Well-being of Aerobic versus Anaerobically Trained Female Athletes

Lindsey Stallworth1, Anna K Whitlock1, Sonja J Lafollette2, Laiken Lewis2, Kristy Thomas1,3, Amy E Wahlquist MS4, W. Andrew Clark PhD, RD, LDN1,3, Mary Andreae MS, RD, LDN1,3, Michael Stone PhD5

College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, Department of Rehabilitative Science1; College of Arts and Science, Department of Biological Science2; Quillen College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Science3; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Clemmer College of Education4, Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology5, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City

Introduction: The human gut microbiome serves a role in health and disease prevention. The composition of intestinal bacteria and their metabolites (fecal fermentation profile, FFP) can influence mood, sleep, immune response, inflammation and the ability to digest and absorb nutrients. Current studies show that populations who are more physically active have a more diverse microbiome compared to sedentary groups, resulting in higher adaptability to physical exertion. There is a limited amount of research focusing on the microbiome of physically active groups with different training regimens. Therefore, we investigated if athletes under aerobic versus anaerobic based training express differences in fecal fermentation profile, nutrient proximate analysis and measures of well-being. We hypothesize that aerobically trained athletes will express a more diverse microbiome as measured by FFP. Materials and Methods: Members from the ETSU Women’s Track and Field Team were recruited to join a research study evaluating physiological differences between aerobically (n=9) and anaerobically (n=3) trained athletes. Research participants read and signed an informed consent document (ETSU IRB-0122.15s-ETSU), completed 2 surveys (anthropometric, well-being), provided fecal (stool) and salivary cortisol samples for analysis. A 1g aliquot of the stool sample was collected and stored at -80 C for future microbiome analysis (UT, Knoxville, TN). The remainder of the stool sample was frozen at -80 C, lyophilized and ground to a fine powder for FFP and nutrient proximate analysis (NPA). FFP isolated short chain volatile fatty acids from the stool were identified via gas chromatography (Shimadzu). NPA of the stool included total calories, total nitrogen, dry matter. Mental well-being in regard to training were assessed via an athlete well-being survey, sport training survey, and salivary cortisol test (taken the morning of providing fecal sample). Dietary habits were assessed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Anthropometric data including height, weight, hydration status and lean body mass (Bio impedance Analysis (BIA)). Results: No statistical differences were noted between groups for FFP, dry matter, total calories or total nitrogen of the stool sample. Anthropometric measures of percent body fat (p < 0.0058), percent skeletal muscle (p < 0.0086) and body mass index (p < 0.0106) were lower for aerobically trained versus anaerobically trained athletes. Not enough surveys were completed for measures of well-being to be statistically analyzed. Conclusion: The hypothesis is rejected since there was no difference in the diversity of short chain volatile fatty acids. The data set is skewed because of the low number of anaerobic athlete participants to fairly evaluate the hypothesis. Additional samples are being sought to balance the data and data for salivary cortisol, food frequency questionnaire and fecal microbiome will be collected later.

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

Fecal Fermentation Profile, Nutrient Proximate Analysis and Well-being of Aerobic versus Anaerobically Trained Female Athletes

Culp Ballroom

Fecal Fermentation Profile, Nutrient Proximate Analysis and Well-being of Aerobic versus Anaerobically Trained Female Athletes

Lindsey Stallworth1, Anna K Whitlock1, Sonja J Lafollette2, Laiken Lewis2, Kristy Thomas1,3, Amy E Wahlquist MS4, W. Andrew Clark PhD, RD, LDN1,3, Mary Andreae MS, RD, LDN1,3, Michael Stone PhD5

College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Science, Department of Rehabilitative Science1; College of Arts and Science, Department of Biological Science2; Quillen College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Science3; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Clemmer College of Education4, Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology5, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City

Introduction: The human gut microbiome serves a role in health and disease prevention. The composition of intestinal bacteria and their metabolites (fecal fermentation profile, FFP) can influence mood, sleep, immune response, inflammation and the ability to digest and absorb nutrients. Current studies show that populations who are more physically active have a more diverse microbiome compared to sedentary groups, resulting in higher adaptability to physical exertion. There is a limited amount of research focusing on the microbiome of physically active groups with different training regimens. Therefore, we investigated if athletes under aerobic versus anaerobic based training express differences in fecal fermentation profile, nutrient proximate analysis and measures of well-being. We hypothesize that aerobically trained athletes will express a more diverse microbiome as measured by FFP. Materials and Methods: Members from the ETSU Women’s Track and Field Team were recruited to join a research study evaluating physiological differences between aerobically (n=9) and anaerobically (n=3) trained athletes. Research participants read and signed an informed consent document (ETSU IRB-0122.15s-ETSU), completed 2 surveys (anthropometric, well-being), provided fecal (stool) and salivary cortisol samples for analysis. A 1g aliquot of the stool sample was collected and stored at -80 C for future microbiome analysis (UT, Knoxville, TN). The remainder of the stool sample was frozen at -80 C, lyophilized and ground to a fine powder for FFP and nutrient proximate analysis (NPA). FFP isolated short chain volatile fatty acids from the stool were identified via gas chromatography (Shimadzu). NPA of the stool included total calories, total nitrogen, dry matter. Mental well-being in regard to training were assessed via an athlete well-being survey, sport training survey, and salivary cortisol test (taken the morning of providing fecal sample). Dietary habits were assessed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Anthropometric data including height, weight, hydration status and lean body mass (Bio impedance Analysis (BIA)). Results: No statistical differences were noted between groups for FFP, dry matter, total calories or total nitrogen of the stool sample. Anthropometric measures of percent body fat (p < 0.0058), percent skeletal muscle (p < 0.0086) and body mass index (p < 0.0106) were lower for aerobically trained versus anaerobically trained athletes. Not enough surveys were completed for measures of well-being to be statistically analyzed. Conclusion: The hypothesis is rejected since there was no difference in the diversity of short chain volatile fatty acids. The data set is skewed because of the low number of anaerobic athlete participants to fairly evaluate the hypothesis. Additional samples are being sought to balance the data and data for salivary cortisol, food frequency questionnaire and fecal microbiome will be collected later.