Project Title

Examining Effects of Direct and Indirect Experiences of Childhood Adversity on Suicidality in Youth who have Engaged in Sexually Abusive Behaviors

Authors' Affiliations

Kristin Mahan, Department of Psychology, College of Arts & Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Jill Stinson, Department of Psychology, College of Arts & Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Culp Room 304

Start Date

4-6-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

4-6-2022 12:00 PM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Psychology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Jill Stinson

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Oral Presentation

Project's Category

Psychology

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Introduction: The effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been long studied in various populations, but there has been limited research on how differential ACEs can lead to more uncommon outcomes in unique and high-risk populations, such as youth who have engaged in sexually abusive behaviors. These youth experience ACEs at higher rates and with greater comorbidity than those who have engaged in nonsexual crimes or without justice-system involvement. ACEs are associated with increased suicidal ideation and attempts, though little research has examined how different types of ACEs (i.e., direct maltreatment vs. indirect maltreatment/household dysfunction) may lead to differential outcomes. In the current study, I analyze relationships between experiences of direct abuse (i.e., physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse) and indirect abuse/household dysfunction (i.e., neglect, parental absence, caregiver substance misuse, caregiver mental illness, witnessing interpersonal violence) on suicidality outcomes in high-risk youth. I hypothesize that indirect maltreatment/household dysfunction will influence the relationships between adverse experiences and suicidality outcomes beyond the influence of direct maltreatment. Methods: Data were collected from archival records of male youth (n = 290) who had previously engaged in sexually abusive behaviors and received treatment from a private, nonprofit residential and outpatient treatment facility in Tennessee. Hierarchical linear and logistic regressions will be used to determine relationships between adverse experiences and various suicidality outcomes (e.g., presence of suicidal ideation or attempts, age at first suicidal ideation), first with direct maltreatment experiences and then indirect maltreatment/household dysfunction experiences. Results & discussion: Results will be discussed, along with implications for enhancing prevention and clinical intervention strategies for managing suicidality among high-risk youth.

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Apr 6th, 11:00 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Examining Effects of Direct and Indirect Experiences of Childhood Adversity on Suicidality in Youth who have Engaged in Sexually Abusive Behaviors

Culp Room 304

Introduction: The effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been long studied in various populations, but there has been limited research on how differential ACEs can lead to more uncommon outcomes in unique and high-risk populations, such as youth who have engaged in sexually abusive behaviors. These youth experience ACEs at higher rates and with greater comorbidity than those who have engaged in nonsexual crimes or without justice-system involvement. ACEs are associated with increased suicidal ideation and attempts, though little research has examined how different types of ACEs (i.e., direct maltreatment vs. indirect maltreatment/household dysfunction) may lead to differential outcomes. In the current study, I analyze relationships between experiences of direct abuse (i.e., physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse) and indirect abuse/household dysfunction (i.e., neglect, parental absence, caregiver substance misuse, caregiver mental illness, witnessing interpersonal violence) on suicidality outcomes in high-risk youth. I hypothesize that indirect maltreatment/household dysfunction will influence the relationships between adverse experiences and suicidality outcomes beyond the influence of direct maltreatment. Methods: Data were collected from archival records of male youth (n = 290) who had previously engaged in sexually abusive behaviors and received treatment from a private, nonprofit residential and outpatient treatment facility in Tennessee. Hierarchical linear and logistic regressions will be used to determine relationships between adverse experiences and various suicidality outcomes (e.g., presence of suicidal ideation or attempts, age at first suicidal ideation), first with direct maltreatment experiences and then indirect maltreatment/household dysfunction experiences. Results & discussion: Results will be discussed, along with implications for enhancing prevention and clinical intervention strategies for managing suicidality among high-risk youth.