Project Title

Hydrologic analyses of Rocky Mount State Historic Site

Authors' Affiliations

Danielle Eaton, Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Robert McSweeney, Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Dr. Ingrid Luffman, Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Culp Ballroom

Start Date

4-7-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2022 12:00 PM

Poster Number

101

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Geosciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Ingrid Luffman

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Project's Category

Water Quality

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Rocky Mount is a 35-acre State Historic Site in Washington County, TN dating to the late 1700s when it served as the First Capitol of the Southwest Territory of the United States. In Fall 2021, Rocky Mount acquired an adjacent tract which includes several water sources: an artesian spring, a ditch with running water, and a cattle pond. A residential spring located on a neighboring property flows along an eastern property line. The purpose of this research was to assess the hydrologic resources of Rocky Mount’s new addition to 1) determine compliance with state water quality standards; and 2) identify subsurface hydrologic connections between water sources. In winter 2022, we sampled the four water sources for pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen (DO), electrical conductivity (EC), temperature, fecal coliform and E. coli bacteria during five site visits. Mean values for each parameter at each site were compared to state water quality standards and sites were assessed for similarity using the Kruskal Wallis non-parametric Analysis of Variance. In this study, none of the four sites met the state standard for drinking water due to presence of E. coli (drinking water limits E. coli to <1 CFU/100mL). However, all sites were well below the E. coli threshold for recreational water (<126 CFU/100mL). Only one site, the residential spring, was found to meet standards for recreational use for all water quality parameters. All other sites exceeded recreational use limits for pH (high alkalinity). Two sites, the cattle pond and the ditch, also exceeded recreational limits for turbidity. Kruskal Wallis test results indicated significant differences in water chemistry between sites for all parameters. Pairwise comparisons revealed differences between the residential spring and all other sites, suggesting different groundwater sources. The water quality findings will be helpful in future land use planning at the Rocky Mount Historic Site.

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

Hydrologic analyses of Rocky Mount State Historic Site

Culp Ballroom

Rocky Mount is a 35-acre State Historic Site in Washington County, TN dating to the late 1700s when it served as the First Capitol of the Southwest Territory of the United States. In Fall 2021, Rocky Mount acquired an adjacent tract which includes several water sources: an artesian spring, a ditch with running water, and a cattle pond. A residential spring located on a neighboring property flows along an eastern property line. The purpose of this research was to assess the hydrologic resources of Rocky Mount’s new addition to 1) determine compliance with state water quality standards; and 2) identify subsurface hydrologic connections between water sources. In winter 2022, we sampled the four water sources for pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen (DO), electrical conductivity (EC), temperature, fecal coliform and E. coli bacteria during five site visits. Mean values for each parameter at each site were compared to state water quality standards and sites were assessed for similarity using the Kruskal Wallis non-parametric Analysis of Variance. In this study, none of the four sites met the state standard for drinking water due to presence of E. coli (drinking water limits E. coli to <1 CFU>/100mL). However, all sites were well below the E. coli threshold for recreational water (<126 CFU>/100mL). Only one site, the residential spring, was found to meet standards for recreational use for all water quality parameters. All other sites exceeded recreational use limits for pH (high alkalinity). Two sites, the cattle pond and the ditch, also exceeded recreational limits for turbidity. Kruskal Wallis test results indicated significant differences in water chemistry between sites for all parameters. Pairwise comparisons revealed differences between the residential spring and all other sites, suggesting different groundwater sources. The water quality findings will be helpful in future land use planning at the Rocky Mount Historic Site.