Project Title

Profile of Poaceae Airborne Pollen (PAP) from 2005 to 2017 in Johnson City, Tennessee

Authors' Affiliations

(Kennedy Averhart is the first author and the person completing registration) Kennedy Averhart, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Stefan M. Pienkowski, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Culp Ballroom

Start Date

4-7-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2022 12:00 PM

Poster Number

117

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Family Medicine

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Reid Blackwelder

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Competitive

Type

Poster Presentation

Project's Category

Immune System Disorders, Community Health, Chronic Illnesses

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Exposure to Poaceae airborne pollen (PAP) has been shown to induce allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to PAP. Patient care for individuals sensitive to PAP can be aided by knowledge of PAP profiles. Air samples were collected using a Rotorod M40 rotation impact sampler from February 2005 to September 2017. Air samples were collected daily, excluding weekends and winter months, and are expressed in grains per cubic meter (g/m3). Light microscopy at 400x magnification was used to analyze samples. Pollen was classified according to the classifications provided by the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology and the National Allergy Bureau. Detection of PAP onset averaged on day 84 (March 25th); end day averaged on day 285 (October 12th); average duration was 202 days; average peak level onset was on day 146 (May 26th) and the average peak level was 135 g/m3. Average number of days during Poaceae season with 1 to 19 g/m^3 detected was 95; with 20 to 39 g/m^3 was 7; with 40 to 59 g/m^3 was 4; and with 60 g/m^3 or more was 2. Day of onset of PAP trended to be 1.6 days earlier in the year over the course of our data collection, with R2= 0.3476. Poaceae airborne pollen in Johnson City, Tennessee was noticeable for almost 7 months out of the year. We can assume the riskiest months of the year are from March to October with the highest risk period being the end of May.

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

Profile of Poaceae Airborne Pollen (PAP) from 2005 to 2017 in Johnson City, Tennessee

Culp Ballroom

Exposure to Poaceae airborne pollen (PAP) has been shown to induce allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to PAP. Patient care for individuals sensitive to PAP can be aided by knowledge of PAP profiles. Air samples were collected using a Rotorod M40 rotation impact sampler from February 2005 to September 2017. Air samples were collected daily, excluding weekends and winter months, and are expressed in grains per cubic meter (g/m3). Light microscopy at 400x magnification was used to analyze samples. Pollen was classified according to the classifications provided by the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology and the National Allergy Bureau. Detection of PAP onset averaged on day 84 (March 25th); end day averaged on day 285 (October 12th); average duration was 202 days; average peak level onset was on day 146 (May 26th) and the average peak level was 135 g/m3. Average number of days during Poaceae season with 1 to 19 g/m^3 detected was 95; with 20 to 39 g/m^3 was 7; with 40 to 59 g/m^3 was 4; and with 60 g/m^3 or more was 2. Day of onset of PAP trended to be 1.6 days earlier in the year over the course of our data collection, with R2= 0.3476. Poaceae airborne pollen in Johnson City, Tennessee was noticeable for almost 7 months out of the year. We can assume the riskiest months of the year are from March to October with the highest risk period being the end of May.