Project Title

Conflict experiences of long-distance dating relationships versus geographically close dating relationships

Author Names

Abigail HammondsFollow

Authors' Affiliations

Abigail Hammonds, Department of Communication and Performance, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tn.

Location

Culp Room 219

Start Date

4-6-2022 9:30 AM

End Date

4-6-2022 9:45 AM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Communication & Performance

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Christine Anzur

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Non-Competitive

Type

Boland Symposium

Project's Category

Communications

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Conflict experiences of long-distance dating relationships versus geographically close dating relationships

Abigail Hammonds, Department of Communication and Performance, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tn.

Interpersonal relationships inherently involve conflict. Previous research has examined conflict in romantic relationships, but few studies have compared the experiences of long-distance partners and geographically close partners. This study was designed to examine whether individuals in long-distance dating relationships and geographically close dating relationships would differ in their use of conflict strategies and experiences of conflict intensity. Participants were recruited from Facebook, Instagram, and Reddit.com. Participants completed a survey including the 39-item Romantic Partner Conflict Scale designed to measure six subscales of conflict management strategies; as well as a new 7-item measure of conflict intensity that was developed for this study. The items were derived from previous research and the measure was tested for reliability. This study found that individuals in long-distance dating relationships and individuals in geographically close dating relationships have extremely similar experiences of conflict and conflict management styles. These results indicate that conflict management styles alter more based on the individual members in the relationship and are unlikely to be changed due to the nature of the relationship. Feature research should be completed to explore determinants of conflict style.

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Apr 6th, 9:30 AM Apr 6th, 9:45 AM

Conflict experiences of long-distance dating relationships versus geographically close dating relationships

Culp Room 219

Conflict experiences of long-distance dating relationships versus geographically close dating relationships

Abigail Hammonds, Department of Communication and Performance, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tn.

Interpersonal relationships inherently involve conflict. Previous research has examined conflict in romantic relationships, but few studies have compared the experiences of long-distance partners and geographically close partners. This study was designed to examine whether individuals in long-distance dating relationships and geographically close dating relationships would differ in their use of conflict strategies and experiences of conflict intensity. Participants were recruited from Facebook, Instagram, and Reddit.com. Participants completed a survey including the 39-item Romantic Partner Conflict Scale designed to measure six subscales of conflict management strategies; as well as a new 7-item measure of conflict intensity that was developed for this study. The items were derived from previous research and the measure was tested for reliability. This study found that individuals in long-distance dating relationships and individuals in geographically close dating relationships have extremely similar experiences of conflict and conflict management styles. These results indicate that conflict management styles alter more based on the individual members in the relationship and are unlikely to be changed due to the nature of the relationship. Feature research should be completed to explore determinants of conflict style.