Project Title

Analyzing Weight-Related Communication by Personal Narrative and Secondary Research

Author Names

Sydney LuffFollow

Authors' Affiliations

Sydney Luff, Department of Communication and Performance, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Culp Room 219

Start Date

4-6-2022 9:45 AM

End Date

4-6-2022 10:00 AM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Communication & Performance

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Kelly Dorgan

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Non-Competitive

Type

Boland Symposium

Project's Category

Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Communications

Abstract or Artist's Statement

Stories reveal forces and conditions under which particular experiences are shaped. Drawing on a personal-storied approach, the author examines weight-related communication. More specifically, this presentation explores communication around and stigmatization of eating disorders. Blending reflexivity and secondary research, the author contends that weight-related scripts, arguably, legitimatize eating disorders within certain performing arts communities. A three-part blog series was used to extend the analysis of weight(y) scripts to lay audiences. Resulting from the above procedure are compelling pieces of literature, as weaving relevant excerpts from personal narrative offer an element of relatability which strictly academic writing cannot always accomplish. Capitalizing on the goal of exposing especially damaging narratives within culture, the work done within the context of these blogs is positioned in such a way which enables it to reach the desired audiences.

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Apr 6th, 9:45 AM Apr 6th, 10:00 AM

Analyzing Weight-Related Communication by Personal Narrative and Secondary Research

Culp Room 219

Stories reveal forces and conditions under which particular experiences are shaped. Drawing on a personal-storied approach, the author examines weight-related communication. More specifically, this presentation explores communication around and stigmatization of eating disorders. Blending reflexivity and secondary research, the author contends that weight-related scripts, arguably, legitimatize eating disorders within certain performing arts communities. A three-part blog series was used to extend the analysis of weight(y) scripts to lay audiences. Resulting from the above procedure are compelling pieces of literature, as weaving relevant excerpts from personal narrative offer an element of relatability which strictly academic writing cannot always accomplish. Capitalizing on the goal of exposing especially damaging narratives within culture, the work done within the context of these blogs is positioned in such a way which enables it to reach the desired audiences.