Project Title

Moravian Redware Pottery in Knox County

Author Names

Hannah L. MainesFollow

Authors' Affiliations

Hannah Maines, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Culp Room 219

Start Date

4-6-2022 11:15 AM

End Date

4-6-2022 11:30 AM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Sociology & Anthropology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

William Duncan

Additional Sponsors

Reagan Cornett

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Competition Type

Non-Competitive

Type

Boland Symposium

Project's Category

Archaeology

Abstract or Artist's Statement

The results of a historic ceramic analysis and a general overview of the history of North Carolina’s Moravian redware pottery are presented with an emphasis on its presence at two late 18th century historical sites, 40KN125 and 40KN275, in Knox County, TN. The connection between the Gibbs site (40KN125) and the Perry site (40KN275) is examined, while also investigating the underlying trade connections between neighboring North Carolina and East Tennessee. The histories of the sites themselves are discussed, alongside historical accounts that link the inhabitants of the two sites. The Moravians who settled in what is now Alamance County, NC were a protestant sect with a history spanning back to early 15th century Germany. These individuals were some of the first Europeans to settle in that region of North Carolina and are widely recognized for their elaborate earthenware vessels. Originating in the mid-1700’s, North Carolina’s Moravian pottery was highly valued by European colonists living in the Carolina Piedmont region. In particular, these redware vessels were in great demand and were traded with early settlers outside of this community. While produced in North Carolina, the archaeological record shows that Moravian redware was extremely rare in East Tennessee during the 18th century. However, archaeological excavations have uncovered Moravian redware at both the Gibbs and Perry sites. The pieces of Moravian redware from both assemblages seem to be strikingly similar and may have originated from a single source. The ceramic analysis includes examining vessel paste, surface treatment, and surface decoration to determine if these pieces originated from the same collection. Maps created using ESRI ArcPro GIS software are also included to examine the larger trade connection between North Carolina’s Piedmont region and eastern Tennessee. Expected results are as follows: paste, surface treatment, and decoration of the vessels from state recorded sites 40KN275 and 40KN125 match, demonstrating a connection between the two sites. This archaeological evidence, alongside written historical records provide insight into East Tennessee’s early 18th century history, and its relationship to adjoining regions during that time period.

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Apr 6th, 11:15 AM Apr 6th, 11:30 AM

Moravian Redware Pottery in Knox County

Culp Room 219

The results of a historic ceramic analysis and a general overview of the history of North Carolina’s Moravian redware pottery are presented with an emphasis on its presence at two late 18th century historical sites, 40KN125 and 40KN275, in Knox County, TN. The connection between the Gibbs site (40KN125) and the Perry site (40KN275) is examined, while also investigating the underlying trade connections between neighboring North Carolina and East Tennessee. The histories of the sites themselves are discussed, alongside historical accounts that link the inhabitants of the two sites. The Moravians who settled in what is now Alamance County, NC were a protestant sect with a history spanning back to early 15th century Germany. These individuals were some of the first Europeans to settle in that region of North Carolina and are widely recognized for their elaborate earthenware vessels. Originating in the mid-1700’s, North Carolina’s Moravian pottery was highly valued by European colonists living in the Carolina Piedmont region. In particular, these redware vessels were in great demand and were traded with early settlers outside of this community. While produced in North Carolina, the archaeological record shows that Moravian redware was extremely rare in East Tennessee during the 18th century. However, archaeological excavations have uncovered Moravian redware at both the Gibbs and Perry sites. The pieces of Moravian redware from both assemblages seem to be strikingly similar and may have originated from a single source. The ceramic analysis includes examining vessel paste, surface treatment, and surface decoration to determine if these pieces originated from the same collection. Maps created using ESRI ArcPro GIS software are also included to examine the larger trade connection between North Carolina’s Piedmont region and eastern Tennessee. Expected results are as follows: paste, surface treatment, and decoration of the vessels from state recorded sites 40KN275 and 40KN125 match, demonstrating a connection between the two sites. This archaeological evidence, alongside written historical records provide insight into East Tennessee’s early 18th century history, and its relationship to adjoining regions during that time period.