Authors' Affiliations

Hannah Holt, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Martin E. Olsen M.D, Department of OB/gyn, East Tenessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Martin Olsen

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Student

Project's Category

Maternal Health

Abstract Text

Objective: This study was completed as a follow up to research regarding buprenorphine Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) in Johnson City Tennessee for-profit clinics. We wished to determine the practice patterns over the last three years.

Methods: Johnson City for-profit Medical Assisted Therapy clinics were called with a telephone survey. When the clinic representative answered the phone, they were asked questions regarding patient costs for therapy, insurance coverage, counseling offered on site, and opportunities for tapering while 20 weeks pregnant.

Results: At all the MAT clinics contacted, the representative informed us that tapering in pregnancy could be considered contrary to current national guidelines. 43% of the clinics are now accepting insurance as compared to 0% in the 2016 study. The average weekly cost per visit remained consistent.

Conclusion: The concept of tapering buprenorphine during pregnancy appears to have become a standard of care for this community and it is offered at all of the clinics that were contacted, some even require it, even though national organizations such as American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and American Society of Addiction Medicine; do not recommend this approach. Patients who have insurance including government funded insurance, are now able to obtain buprenorphine with no out of pocket expense at numerous clinics. The high cost for the uninsured patient continues to create an environment conducive to buprenorphine diversion.

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Follow-Up: Provision of Buprenorphine to Pregnant Women by For-Profit Clinics in an Appalachian City

Objective: This study was completed as a follow up to research regarding buprenorphine Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) in Johnson City Tennessee for-profit clinics. We wished to determine the practice patterns over the last three years.

Methods: Johnson City for-profit Medical Assisted Therapy clinics were called with a telephone survey. When the clinic representative answered the phone, they were asked questions regarding patient costs for therapy, insurance coverage, counseling offered on site, and opportunities for tapering while 20 weeks pregnant.

Results: At all the MAT clinics contacted, the representative informed us that tapering in pregnancy could be considered contrary to current national guidelines. 43% of the clinics are now accepting insurance as compared to 0% in the 2016 study. The average weekly cost per visit remained consistent.

Conclusion: The concept of tapering buprenorphine during pregnancy appears to have become a standard of care for this community and it is offered at all of the clinics that were contacted, some even require it, even though national organizations such as American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and American Society of Addiction Medicine; do not recommend this approach. Patients who have insurance including government funded insurance, are now able to obtain buprenorphine with no out of pocket expense at numerous clinics. The high cost for the uninsured patient continues to create an environment conducive to buprenorphine diversion.