Authors' Affiliations

William B Roepke, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Brian V Viscomi, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Jordan B Newby, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Ryan P Serbin, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Robert M Becker, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Ethan R Harris, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Caroline L Abercrombie, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Paul W Gorman, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Derek A Lance, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Publication date

2020

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Biomedical Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Caroline Abercrombie

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Student

Project's Category

Education or Instructional Programs

Abstract Text

INTRODUCTION: The purposes of this study are to determine whether Thiel-embalmed cadavers are an effective educational tool in teaching medical students to perform knee arthrocentesis, to compare the use of Thiel-embalmed cadavers to formalin-embalmed cadavers in arthrocentesis education, and to determine whether the use of Thiel-embalmed cadavers is potentially generalizable to the instruction of other orthopedic procedures.

METHODS: Sixty-eight third-year medical students participated in the study. The participants first completed a pre-survey to assess their prior experience with arthrocentesis procedures and Thiel-embalmed cadavers. Participants then attended an instructional session where the knee arthrocentesis procedure was demonstrated on a Thiel-embalmed cadaver. Participants then individually performed the simulated knee arthrocentesis procedure twice: once on a Thiel-embalmed cadaver and once on a formalin-embalmed cadaver. Success of each attempt was determined through the visualization of aspirated joint fluid. Following the laboratory session, each participant completed a post-survey to determine whether the session improved their perceived confidence in performing knee arthrocentesis, if they preferred the use of Thiel-embalmed cadavers or formalin-embalmed cadavers as a teaching tool, and if they believed simulated practice using Thiel-embalmed cadavers would be effective for learning other orthopedic procedural skills.

RESULTS: Sixty-eight students participated in the laboratory session and successfully completed both pre- and post-course surveys. 96% of participants reported that they felt confident performing knee arthrocentesis under physician supervision following their participation in the laboratory session (versus 15% of participants in the pre-survey). 96% of participants reported that the Thiel-embalmed cadavers provided a more realistic teaching model than formalin-embalmed cadavers for learning knee arthrocentesis. 100% of participants believed the incorporation of simulated practice using Thiel-embalmed cadavers is an effective method in teaching students to perform knee arthrocentesis. 100% of participants reported that they would participate in future sessions using Thiel-embalmed cadavers to learn and practice other orthopedic procedural techniques.

DISCUSSION: This study used a moderate sample size of third-year medical students to provide data regarding the suitability of using Thiel cadavers in arthrocentesis education. Results indicate that Thiel cadavers are effective tools in teaching medical students to perform knee arthrocentesis, that students preferred the Thiel cadavers to the formalin cadavers, and that the use of Thiel cadavers is a safe, engaging, and high-quality teaching modality for demonstrating proper arthrocentesis procedural technique to medical students. Since this study looked specifically at teaching knee arthrocentesis to medical students, it is uncertain whether the benefits of Thiel cadavers are generalizable to the education of other orthopedic procedures and subject groups such as residents, fellows, and practicing physicians. Further studies should be performed to assess whether Thiel cadavers are beneficial in teaching other orthopaedic procedures and if these benefits extend to other subject groups.

Share

COinS
 

Are Thiel-embalmed Cadavers Effective Tools in Educating Medical Students to Perform Knee Arthrocentesis?

INTRODUCTION: The purposes of this study are to determine whether Thiel-embalmed cadavers are an effective educational tool in teaching medical students to perform knee arthrocentesis, to compare the use of Thiel-embalmed cadavers to formalin-embalmed cadavers in arthrocentesis education, and to determine whether the use of Thiel-embalmed cadavers is potentially generalizable to the instruction of other orthopedic procedures.

METHODS: Sixty-eight third-year medical students participated in the study. The participants first completed a pre-survey to assess their prior experience with arthrocentesis procedures and Thiel-embalmed cadavers. Participants then attended an instructional session where the knee arthrocentesis procedure was demonstrated on a Thiel-embalmed cadaver. Participants then individually performed the simulated knee arthrocentesis procedure twice: once on a Thiel-embalmed cadaver and once on a formalin-embalmed cadaver. Success of each attempt was determined through the visualization of aspirated joint fluid. Following the laboratory session, each participant completed a post-survey to determine whether the session improved their perceived confidence in performing knee arthrocentesis, if they preferred the use of Thiel-embalmed cadavers or formalin-embalmed cadavers as a teaching tool, and if they believed simulated practice using Thiel-embalmed cadavers would be effective for learning other orthopedic procedural skills.

RESULTS: Sixty-eight students participated in the laboratory session and successfully completed both pre- and post-course surveys. 96% of participants reported that they felt confident performing knee arthrocentesis under physician supervision following their participation in the laboratory session (versus 15% of participants in the pre-survey). 96% of participants reported that the Thiel-embalmed cadavers provided a more realistic teaching model than formalin-embalmed cadavers for learning knee arthrocentesis. 100% of participants believed the incorporation of simulated practice using Thiel-embalmed cadavers is an effective method in teaching students to perform knee arthrocentesis. 100% of participants reported that they would participate in future sessions using Thiel-embalmed cadavers to learn and practice other orthopedic procedural techniques.

DISCUSSION: This study used a moderate sample size of third-year medical students to provide data regarding the suitability of using Thiel cadavers in arthrocentesis education. Results indicate that Thiel cadavers are effective tools in teaching medical students to perform knee arthrocentesis, that students preferred the Thiel cadavers to the formalin cadavers, and that the use of Thiel cadavers is a safe, engaging, and high-quality teaching modality for demonstrating proper arthrocentesis procedural technique to medical students. Since this study looked specifically at teaching knee arthrocentesis to medical students, it is uncertain whether the benefits of Thiel cadavers are generalizable to the education of other orthopedic procedures and subject groups such as residents, fellows, and practicing physicians. Further studies should be performed to assess whether Thiel cadavers are beneficial in teaching other orthopaedic procedures and if these benefits extend to other subject groups.