Authors' Affiliations

Patrick Olumuyiwa Sodeke , Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Kanta Bhetuwal , Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Alyson Chroust , Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Michelle Johnson , Department of Rehabilitative Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Darshan Shah , Department of Pediatrics, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Pediatrics

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Darshan Shah

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Neonatal Disorders

Abstract Text

Background: The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS), a drug withdrawal syndrome mainly associated with opioid exposure in-utero has significantly increased in the United States over the last decade with infants with NOWS staying longer in the hospital than those without NOWS. Objectives: To determine if feeding tube use while on admission is associated with length of hospital stay among infants diagnosed with NOWS. We also compared the differences between infants with NOWS who required the use of feeding tubes while on admission, and those that did not, based on infant and maternal characteristics. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of infants delivered between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2016 at Ballad Health System. Our inclusion criteria were infants who were exposed to opioids in-utero and received a diagnosis of NOWS based on 2 consecutive Finnegan scores of 10, or 3 consecutive scores of 8, or treatment with morphine. Medical chart record of 294 infants who met these criteria were reviewed for infant and maternal characteristics. Our outcome variable was infant length of hospital stay and our predictor variable was feeding tube use an indicator for feeding difficulties. Chi-square test and t-test were used to compare infant and maternal characteristics by feeding tube use. Simple linear regression models were used to assess the effect of feeding tube use and infant and maternal characteristics on infant length of hospital stay. Multiple linear regression was used to model infant length of hospital stay predicted by feeding tube use, while adjusting for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, treatment with morphine, and maternal benzodiazepine use during pregnancy. All analyses were done using SAS 9.4. Results: Of the 294 infants diagnosed with NOWS, 22.11% had feeding difficulties that necessitated use of feeding tubes. Infants who used feeding tubes were significantly more likely to be born preterm (20.31% vs 8.73%, p=0.0096) to be admitted into the NICU (98.46% vs 51.09%, p=

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Association between Feeding Difficulties and Length of Hospital Stay among Infants Diagnosed with Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome

Background: The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS), a drug withdrawal syndrome mainly associated with opioid exposure in-utero has significantly increased in the United States over the last decade with infants with NOWS staying longer in the hospital than those without NOWS. Objectives: To determine if feeding tube use while on admission is associated with length of hospital stay among infants diagnosed with NOWS. We also compared the differences between infants with NOWS who required the use of feeding tubes while on admission, and those that did not, based on infant and maternal characteristics. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of infants delivered between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2016 at Ballad Health System. Our inclusion criteria were infants who were exposed to opioids in-utero and received a diagnosis of NOWS based on 2 consecutive Finnegan scores of 10, or 3 consecutive scores of 8, or treatment with morphine. Medical chart record of 294 infants who met these criteria were reviewed for infant and maternal characteristics. Our outcome variable was infant length of hospital stay and our predictor variable was feeding tube use an indicator for feeding difficulties. Chi-square test and t-test were used to compare infant and maternal characteristics by feeding tube use. Simple linear regression models were used to assess the effect of feeding tube use and infant and maternal characteristics on infant length of hospital stay. Multiple linear regression was used to model infant length of hospital stay predicted by feeding tube use, while adjusting for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, treatment with morphine, and maternal benzodiazepine use during pregnancy. All analyses were done using SAS 9.4. Results: Of the 294 infants diagnosed with NOWS, 22.11% had feeding difficulties that necessitated use of feeding tubes. Infants who used feeding tubes were significantly more likely to be born preterm (20.31% vs 8.73%, p=0.0096) to be admitted into the NICU (98.46% vs 51.09%, p=