Authors' Affiliations

Emmy Davis, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences , East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Alexis Gonzalez, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences , East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Kyle Wolske, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences , East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Brenda Louw, D.Phil., Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Publication date

2020

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Audiology & Speech Pathology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Brenda Louw

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Cultural Studies, Rehabilitation or Therapy

Abstract Text

Insufficient research training contributes to the current shortage of researchers in the field of speech-language pathology, but also to the dearth of multicultural and multilingual (MCML) research. There is limited information regarding how MCML issues are addressed in Research Methods courses in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD). One of the ways in which this problem can be addressed is to include MCML issues into CSD research methods courses. A survey, “Integration of MCML Issues in Research Coursework” was developed based on an in-depth literature review. The aim of the survey was to gain information from instructors by examining the extent to which MCML issues are included in their CSD research methods courses. A total of 56 instructors responded to the survey. In the survey, 41.03% respondents indicated that it was very important to include MCML issues but only 28.21% included this topic in their course objectives. Time constraints, curricula overload, and specific courses on MCML were most cited as reasons for not including MCML. 44.44% used Research Ethics and 27.78% used EBP as strategies to infuse MCML into courses. 61.11% had further interest in the topic. By addressing MCML issues and culturally responsive research in CSD research methods classes, it is hypothesized that future speech-language pathologists will be better equipped not only to provide evidence-based services to the diverse populations they serve, but also be better prepared to conduct research on these diverse populations.

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Multicultural/Multilingual Issues in CSD Research Methods Coursework: A Neglected Topic?

Insufficient research training contributes to the current shortage of researchers in the field of speech-language pathology, but also to the dearth of multicultural and multilingual (MCML) research. There is limited information regarding how MCML issues are addressed in Research Methods courses in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD). One of the ways in which this problem can be addressed is to include MCML issues into CSD research methods courses. A survey, “Integration of MCML Issues in Research Coursework” was developed based on an in-depth literature review. The aim of the survey was to gain information from instructors by examining the extent to which MCML issues are included in their CSD research methods courses. A total of 56 instructors responded to the survey. In the survey, 41.03% respondents indicated that it was very important to include MCML issues but only 28.21% included this topic in their course objectives. Time constraints, curricula overload, and specific courses on MCML were most cited as reasons for not including MCML. 44.44% used Research Ethics and 27.78% used EBP as strategies to infuse MCML into courses. 61.11% had further interest in the topic. By addressing MCML issues and culturally responsive research in CSD research methods classes, it is hypothesized that future speech-language pathologists will be better equipped not only to provide evidence-based services to the diverse populations they serve, but also be better prepared to conduct research on these diverse populations.