Project Title

Hepatitis C Virus Screening in Federally Qualified Health Centers in Rural Appalachia

Authors' Affiliations

Folawiyo S Olanrewaju, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University Ayotola Falodun, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University Muhammed Jawla, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University Patricia Vanhook, College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University Stacey McKenzie, College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

108

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Nursing

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Patricia Vanhook

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Liver Functions, Viral Infections, Rural Health, Community Health, Health of Underserved Populations, Health Services Delivery, Medical Intervention Methods, Minority Health, Patient Care and Education, Public Health, Inflammation, Infectious Diseases, Communicable Diseases, Chronic Illnesses, Cancer or Carcinogenesis, Reproductive System

Abstract Text

The prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in the US is estimated at 3.5 million with 18,153 deaths in 2016. It is the most common bloodborne infection, with a higher age-adjusted mortality rate than Hepatitis B Virus or Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Without treatment, nearly 1.1 million people will die from HCV by 2060. About 41,200 new cases of HCV were reported in 41 states in the US in 2016. The reported cases of acute HCV in 2016 is 2.3 per 100,000 in Tennessee, which is more than twice the national goal set by Healthy People 2020. This is a descriptive study to ascertain the HCV prevalence and usefulness of screening in medical outreach settings (MO) compared to indigent healthcare clinics (IHC) in northeast Tennessee. This study period was from April 2017 – February 2019. Participants (n=250), were adults, who engaged in routine, opt-out HCV testing at 4 IHC and 3 MO sites in the Tri-Cities, TN region. During the screening, demographic information- age, gender, race- were collected and the de-identified data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS 9.3) to perform a descriptive analysis. Also, several discrete Chi-Square tests of independence between the demographic variables, screening locations, and HCV antibody prevalence was conducted. A total of 250 clients were screened for HCV. The majority of clients screened were non-Hispanic whites 228 (91.20%); females 136 (54.40%); young adults 131 (52.40%) and at IHC clinics 187 (74.80%). Screening showed HCV antibody prevalence of 14.8%. The majority of positive cases were non-Hispanic whites 36 (97.30%; P=0.1561); females 19 (51.35%; P=0.6867) and young adults 23 (62.16%; P=0.286). The prevalence at the IHC clinics and MO settings were 36 (97.30%; P=0.0006) and 1(2.70%) respectively. This analysis shows the higher yield of targeted HCV screening at IHC clinics. Focused HCV screening is critical in the era of opioid epidemic, particularly when direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) which offer a Sustained Virologic Response (SVR) rate of more than 90% are available. The use of case control or cohort study designs to establish causality is recommended for improving focused HCV screening.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Hepatitis C Virus Screening in Federally Qualified Health Centers in Rural Appalachia

White Top Mtn

The prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in the US is estimated at 3.5 million with 18,153 deaths in 2016. It is the most common bloodborne infection, with a higher age-adjusted mortality rate than Hepatitis B Virus or Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Without treatment, nearly 1.1 million people will die from HCV by 2060. About 41,200 new cases of HCV were reported in 41 states in the US in 2016. The reported cases of acute HCV in 2016 is 2.3 per 100,000 in Tennessee, which is more than twice the national goal set by Healthy People 2020. This is a descriptive study to ascertain the HCV prevalence and usefulness of screening in medical outreach settings (MO) compared to indigent healthcare clinics (IHC) in northeast Tennessee. This study period was from April 2017 – February 2019. Participants (n=250), were adults, who engaged in routine, opt-out HCV testing at 4 IHC and 3 MO sites in the Tri-Cities, TN region. During the screening, demographic information- age, gender, race- were collected and the de-identified data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS 9.3) to perform a descriptive analysis. Also, several discrete Chi-Square tests of independence between the demographic variables, screening locations, and HCV antibody prevalence was conducted. A total of 250 clients were screened for HCV. The majority of clients screened were non-Hispanic whites 228 (91.20%); females 136 (54.40%); young adults 131 (52.40%) and at IHC clinics 187 (74.80%). Screening showed HCV antibody prevalence of 14.8%. The majority of positive cases were non-Hispanic whites 36 (97.30%; P=0.1561); females 19 (51.35%; P=0.6867) and young adults 23 (62.16%; P=0.286). The prevalence at the IHC clinics and MO settings were 36 (97.30%; P=0.0006) and 1(2.70%) respectively. This analysis shows the higher yield of targeted HCV screening at IHC clinics. Focused HCV screening is critical in the era of opioid epidemic, particularly when direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) which offer a Sustained Virologic Response (SVR) rate of more than 90% are available. The use of case control or cohort study designs to establish causality is recommended for improving focused HCV screening.