Authors' Affiliations

Jie Yin is the first author and the person completing registration Jie Yin, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, USA Na Wang, School of Public Health, Guilin Medical University, Guilin, China Bo Huang, School of Public Health, Guilin Medical University, Guilin, China Yuhua Ruan, State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China K. Rivet Amico, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Sten H. Vermund, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Han-Zhu Qian, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Shimin Zheng, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, USA

Location

White Top Mtn

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

109

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Biostatistics & Epidemiology

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Shimin Zheng

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Public Health

Abstract Text

Introduction: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are more likely to experience Intimate partner violence (IPV) during their lifetime than heterosexual couples. HIV-status and related HIV stigma may play an important role in IPV within intimate partnerships among MSM. HIV- and MSM-related stigmas are common among Chinese MSM, yet there is sparse literature on IPV and its relationship with stigma in this vulnerable population. We evaluate the prevalence of IPV and its relationship with HIV- and MSM-related stigma among newly diagnosed HIV-infected MSM in Beijing, China.

Methods: Data were collected in the baseline survey among newly HIV-diagnosed Chinese MSM in a randomized clinical trial via face-to-face interviews. Simple and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between IPV and HIV- and MSM-related stigma.

Results: Of 367 newly HIV-diagnosed Chinese MSM, 23.7% experienced any IPV, including 16.6% physical, 7.4% psychological and 5.2% sexual IPV. Positive associations were found between HIV- and MSM-related stigma and IPV. Men with high HIV-related stigma (score ≥27) were 1.68 times as likely to experience any IPV as those with low stigma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-2.76). Men with high MSM-related stigma (score ≥6) were 1.98 times as likely to experience any IPV as those with low stigma (AOR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.19-3.31). Men with high HIV- and MSM-related stigma were 2.86 times as likely to experience any IPV as those with low stigma (AOR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.44-5.69).

Conclusion: HIV- and MSM-related stigma was positively associated with IPV experiences among newly diagnosed MSM in China. The manner in which stigma may exacerbate IPV, and/or the influence of IPV on worsening stigma should be further evaluated. The high prevalence of IPV and stigma in this population suggests that interventions should be taken to reduce stigma and prevent this risky behavior among MSM.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Association between Stigma and Intimate Partner Violence among Newly HIV-Diagnosed Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men

White Top Mtn

Introduction: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are more likely to experience Intimate partner violence (IPV) during their lifetime than heterosexual couples. HIV-status and related HIV stigma may play an important role in IPV within intimate partnerships among MSM. HIV- and MSM-related stigmas are common among Chinese MSM, yet there is sparse literature on IPV and its relationship with stigma in this vulnerable population. We evaluate the prevalence of IPV and its relationship with HIV- and MSM-related stigma among newly diagnosed HIV-infected MSM in Beijing, China.

Methods: Data were collected in the baseline survey among newly HIV-diagnosed Chinese MSM in a randomized clinical trial via face-to-face interviews. Simple and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between IPV and HIV- and MSM-related stigma.

Results: Of 367 newly HIV-diagnosed Chinese MSM, 23.7% experienced any IPV, including 16.6% physical, 7.4% psychological and 5.2% sexual IPV. Positive associations were found between HIV- and MSM-related stigma and IPV. Men with high HIV-related stigma (score ≥27) were 1.68 times as likely to experience any IPV as those with low stigma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-2.76). Men with high MSM-related stigma (score ≥6) were 1.98 times as likely to experience any IPV as those with low stigma (AOR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.19-3.31). Men with high HIV- and MSM-related stigma were 2.86 times as likely to experience any IPV as those with low stigma (AOR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.44-5.69).

Conclusion: HIV- and MSM-related stigma was positively associated with IPV experiences among newly diagnosed MSM in China. The manner in which stigma may exacerbate IPV, and/or the influence of IPV on worsening stigma should be further evaluated. The high prevalence of IPV and stigma in this population suggests that interventions should be taken to reduce stigma and prevent this risky behavior among MSM.