Project Title

A Novel Compound to Combat Invasive Staphylococcal Species in Human and Animal Medicine

Authors' Affiliations

Leah McHale, Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Tasha K. Nelson, Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Dr. Sean Fox, Department of Health Sciences, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Dr. William Clark, Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

21

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Sciences

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Sean Fox

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Biofilms, Microbiology, Molecular Biology

Abstract Text

An alarming problem has plagued both human and veterinary healthcare for decades: the ever-increasing presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Specifically, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) are of great concern. A new compound, aptly named, LavenGel has recently been developed and demonstrates treatment potential to effectively inhibit the growth of at least two Staphylococcus species: S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius. LavenGel has been previously shown in our lab to inhibit a variety of microbes, particularly S. aureus. However, the molecular pathway that LavenGel utilizes to inhibit S. aureus and whether this inhibition could be translated to other Staphylococcus species, particularly in animals, has yet to be investigated. The major aims of this study are to demonstrate and quantify the efficacy of LavenGel in preventing S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius growth and to understand the specific S. aureus cellular mechanisms that LavenGel impacts. In order to quantitatively represent the effectiveness of LavenGel for veterinary purposes, biofilms of S. pseudintermedius were treated at different phases of development. LavenGel inhibited both the attachment of cells to form biofilms, as well as the eradication of pre-existing biofilms. Minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bacterial concentrations were determind for S. pseudintermedius. To better understand the impact that LavenGel may have in human healthcare, a panel of genes expressed under LavenGel treatment were examined. LavenGel does not induce the typical SOS response in S. aureus that is seen when using other leading bactericidal treatments for Staphylococcus infections which have also been shown to induce resistance. LavenGel could potentially help solve the bacterial resistance issue by working against the bacterial cell membrane instead of inducing the typical SOS response. The threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria is a constant concern in the scientific and healthcare community. The implications of this study dictate LavenGel is a highly effective, all-natural, unique option for treating common Staphylococcus infections in both veterinary and human healthcare and shows promise as a treatment that, as of yet, does not induce bacterial resistance. LavenGel could prove to be a powerful tool in the future of medical management of bacterial infections.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

A Novel Compound to Combat Invasive Staphylococcal Species in Human and Animal Medicine

Ballroom

An alarming problem has plagued both human and veterinary healthcare for decades: the ever-increasing presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Specifically, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) are of great concern. A new compound, aptly named, LavenGel has recently been developed and demonstrates treatment potential to effectively inhibit the growth of at least two Staphylococcus species: S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius. LavenGel has been previously shown in our lab to inhibit a variety of microbes, particularly S. aureus. However, the molecular pathway that LavenGel utilizes to inhibit S. aureus and whether this inhibition could be translated to other Staphylococcus species, particularly in animals, has yet to be investigated. The major aims of this study are to demonstrate and quantify the efficacy of LavenGel in preventing S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius growth and to understand the specific S. aureus cellular mechanisms that LavenGel impacts. In order to quantitatively represent the effectiveness of LavenGel for veterinary purposes, biofilms of S. pseudintermedius were treated at different phases of development. LavenGel inhibited both the attachment of cells to form biofilms, as well as the eradication of pre-existing biofilms. Minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bacterial concentrations were determind for S. pseudintermedius. To better understand the impact that LavenGel may have in human healthcare, a panel of genes expressed under LavenGel treatment were examined. LavenGel does not induce the typical SOS response in S. aureus that is seen when using other leading bactericidal treatments for Staphylococcus infections which have also been shown to induce resistance. LavenGel could potentially help solve the bacterial resistance issue by working against the bacterial cell membrane instead of inducing the typical SOS response. The threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria is a constant concern in the scientific and healthcare community. The implications of this study dictate LavenGel is a highly effective, all-natural, unique option for treating common Staphylococcus infections in both veterinary and human healthcare and shows promise as a treatment that, as of yet, does not induce bacterial resistance. LavenGel could prove to be a powerful tool in the future of medical management of bacterial infections.