Project Title

What About Food? Food Insecurity Screening in the Clinical Setting

Authors' Affiliations

Liane Ventura, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Dr. Mary Ann Littleton, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Start Date

4-12-2019 2:20 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:35 PM

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Community & Behavioral Health

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Mary Ann Littleton

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Other Education, Community Health, Public Health

Abstract Text

In the United States, 30.3 million people live with diabetes. The cost of the disease is immense and the need for successful management strategies is pertinent. Food insecurity is associated with both the development and the poor management of diabetes. Several behavioral risk factors associated with food insecurity that influence the poor management of the disease include financial concerns, smoking, and disrupted eating patterns. Food insecurity screening in the clinical setting is endorsed by several professional organizations. To address the intersection between clinical care and this social determinant of health, an educational and training program was developed and implemented. The Theory of Planned Behavior is utilized for provider-level interventions and was applied to the program design for What About Food? Food insecurity screening in the clinical setting, which focuses on the topics of food insecurity and screening patients for food insecurity. Program content was evidence-based and employed a variety of learning strategies. The program was evaluated with a non-experimental pre- and post-test design. The program was successful in increasing knowledge about food insecurity, self-efficacy in screening for food insecurity, and in improving attitude toward food insecurity screening. The potential to tailor the program for specific groups is promising.

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Apr 12th, 2:20 PM Apr 12th, 2:35 PM

What About Food? Food Insecurity Screening in the Clinical Setting

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

In the United States, 30.3 million people live with diabetes. The cost of the disease is immense and the need for successful management strategies is pertinent. Food insecurity is associated with both the development and the poor management of diabetes. Several behavioral risk factors associated with food insecurity that influence the poor management of the disease include financial concerns, smoking, and disrupted eating patterns. Food insecurity screening in the clinical setting is endorsed by several professional organizations. To address the intersection between clinical care and this social determinant of health, an educational and training program was developed and implemented. The Theory of Planned Behavior is utilized for provider-level interventions and was applied to the program design for What About Food? Food insecurity screening in the clinical setting, which focuses on the topics of food insecurity and screening patients for food insecurity. Program content was evidence-based and employed a variety of learning strategies. The program was evaluated with a non-experimental pre- and post-test design. The program was successful in increasing knowledge about food insecurity, self-efficacy in screening for food insecurity, and in improving attitude toward food insecurity screening. The potential to tailor the program for specific groups is promising.