Project Title

The Effects of the Patient-Provider Interaction During Contraceptive Counseling on the Satisfaction with and Confidence Using the Selected Birth Control Method Among Southern Women

Authors' Affiliations

Paezha McCartt, Department of Health Services Management and Policy, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN. Dr. Nathan Hale, Department of Health Services Management and Policy, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

85

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Health Services Management & Policy

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Nathan Hale

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Healthcare, Womens Health, Reproductive Health Services

Abstract Text

INTRODUCTION) Modern contraception is a safe and effective clinical service for reducing unintended pregnancy and improving birth spacing for women. Provider counseling is an important factor that may influence women’s decision making, satisfaction, and self-efficacy with contraception use. This study measures women’s perceptions of recent provider interactions and examines the extent to which these perceptions are associated with method satisfaction and confidence in use. We hypothesize that women who perceive more positive interactions are ultimately more satisfied and confident with their contraceptive method choice. METHODS) A cross-sectional survey of adult reproductive-aged women in two southern states (aged 18 to 44 years old) was used for the analysis. The Statewide Survey of Women was conducted in 2017 by NORC at the University of Chicago. Women were asked to rate providers across a series of statements reflecting aspects of patient-centered contraceptive counseling using a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were dichotomized to reflect those with very good/excellent experiences compared to those with less favorable experiences (Poor, Fair, Good). Women were subsequently asked about their level of satisfaction with current contraceptive methods and confidence in use, also using a 5-point Likert scale. These measures were also dichotomized. A chi-squared test for independence and unadjusted logistic regression models were used to examine associations between patient-provider interactions, satisfaction and confidence in contraceptive use. FINDINGS) The survey included 4,281 respondents. The majority of women reported being satisfied with their current contraceptive method (92.6%) and confident in its use (94.9%). Approximately 93% of women who felt respected as a person by their provider also reported being satisfied with their current birth control method, compared to 73% among women who did not feel respected as a person (p<0.001). Among women who felt their provider allowed them to say what mattered to them about their birth control method, 93.5% were satisfied with their current method, compared to 75% among those who did not feel allowed to say what mattered (p<0.001). Women who felt like their provider took their preferences for birth control into consideration were also more satisfied with their current birth control method compared to those who did not feel the same way (93.7% versus 73.5%; p<0.001). Women who felt their provider allowed them to say what mattered and those who felt their provider took their preferences into consideration were also associated with higher rates of confidence in correct use. Women reporting that their provider gave them enough information to make the best decision about their birth control method was also associated with greater confidence in correct use (95.6% versus 87.5%; p=0.007). CONCLUSION) Findings suggest that positive patient-provider interactions are associated with increased satisfaction in current contraceptive method use. Interestingly, women reporting that providers did not give them enough information to make the best decision about birth control methods also reported being less confident in using their current method. Collectively, these findings support existing evidence suggesting that patient-provider interactions are important for patient-centered care and can be used to inform future clinical practice guidelines around contraceptive counseling.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

The Effects of the Patient-Provider Interaction During Contraceptive Counseling on the Satisfaction with and Confidence Using the Selected Birth Control Method Among Southern Women

Ballroom

INTRODUCTION) Modern contraception is a safe and effective clinical service for reducing unintended pregnancy and improving birth spacing for women. Provider counseling is an important factor that may influence women’s decision making, satisfaction, and self-efficacy with contraception use. This study measures women’s perceptions of recent provider interactions and examines the extent to which these perceptions are associated with method satisfaction and confidence in use. We hypothesize that women who perceive more positive interactions are ultimately more satisfied and confident with their contraceptive method choice. METHODS) A cross-sectional survey of adult reproductive-aged women in two southern states (aged 18 to 44 years old) was used for the analysis. The Statewide Survey of Women was conducted in 2017 by NORC at the University of Chicago. Women were asked to rate providers across a series of statements reflecting aspects of patient-centered contraceptive counseling using a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were dichotomized to reflect those with very good/excellent experiences compared to those with less favorable experiences (Poor, Fair, Good). Women were subsequently asked about their level of satisfaction with current contraceptive methods and confidence in use, also using a 5-point Likert scale. These measures were also dichotomized. A chi-squared test for independence and unadjusted logistic regression models were used to examine associations between patient-provider interactions, satisfaction and confidence in contraceptive use. FINDINGS) The survey included 4,281 respondents. The majority of women reported being satisfied with their current contraceptive method (92.6%) and confident in its use (94.9%). Approximately 93% of women who felt respected as a person by their provider also reported being satisfied with their current birth control method, compared to 73% among women who did not feel respected as a person (p<0.001). Among women who felt their provider allowed them to say what mattered to them about their birth control method, 93.5% were satisfied with their current method, compared to 75% among those who did not feel allowed to say what mattered (p<0.001). Women who felt like their provider took their preferences for birth control into consideration were also more satisfied with their current birth control method compared to those who did not feel the same way (93.7% versus 73.5%; p<0.001). Women who felt their provider allowed them to say what mattered and those who felt their provider took their preferences into consideration were also associated with higher rates of confidence in correct use. Women reporting that their provider gave them enough information to make the best decision about their birth control method was also associated with greater confidence in correct use (95.6% versus 87.5%; p=0.007). CONCLUSION) Findings suggest that positive patient-provider interactions are associated with increased satisfaction in current contraceptive method use. Interestingly, women reporting that providers did not give them enough information to make the best decision about birth control methods also reported being less confident in using their current method. Collectively, these findings support existing evidence suggesting that patient-provider interactions are important for patient-centered care and can be used to inform future clinical practice guidelines around contraceptive counseling.