Authors' Affiliations

Ryan Kerrins BSN, RN, CCRN, DNP candidate, College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Jean Hemphill Ph.D., FNP-BC. College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-12-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:30 PM

Poster Number

95

Faculty Sponsor’s Department

Nursing

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Jean Hemphill

Type

Poster: Non-Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Family Health Services, Health of Underserved Populations, Mental Health Services

Abstract Text

Purpose

The Johnson City Downtown Day Center (JCDDC) provides integrated inter-professional primary care, mental health, and social work case management services to homeless and under-served persons who have difficulty accessing traditional systems. Because of the exponential rise in substance abuse in the Appalachian region, the JCDDC providers and staff initiated SBIRT as recommended standard of care, as endorsed by SAMHSA, United States Public Health Services Task Force, and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. The JCDDC has two mechanisms by which patients can choose to participate in substance abuse treatment: SMART Recovery, and psychiatric nurse practitioner (NP) referrals. The purpose of the project evaluates use of SBIRT at the JCDDC by determining process of (1) referral and (2) follow-up rates of those who received SBIRT; analyzing outcomes by measuring numbers of: (1) screens administered; (2) brief interventions; (3) positive screens; (4) referrals to either SMART Recovery or to the psychiatric NP; (5) participation in one follow-up.

Review of Literature:

Approximately 6.4 million people, or 2.4% of the U.S. population 12 years and older, currently misuse prescription medications. There is an undeniable and tangible correlation between the chronic disease of substance use disorder and unstable housing or homelessness (de Chesnay & Anderson, 2016). Similarly, substance use disorder was found to be much more common in people facing homelessness than in people who had stable housing (National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has been the most significant funding source for SBIRT proliferation in the United States. Despite a demonstrated need for substance abuse services among this vulnerable population, people who are homeless have substantially greater barriers to obtaining treatment and often go without.

Summary of Innovation or Practice

The current SBIRT process includes use of DAST-10 and AUDIT tools. Evaluating clinic processes and outcomes in vulnerable populations who have inconsistent erratic follow-up is challenging. However, new ways of understanding patterns and incremental outcomes is essential to addressing clinic practice that can impact outcomes in vulnerable groups.

Implications for NPs

The heterogeneity of the homeless population is often precipitated by a host of complicating factors including co-occurring mental illness, multiple chronic conditions, unstable income, and lack of transportation. Therefore, the importance of finding effective, cost-conscious processes that are population specific and patient-centered is essential for future research and policy. The inter-professional model of care also informs future practice by evaluating the feasibility of administering all of the elements of SBIRT in a single facility.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT): Process Improvement in a Nurse-Managed Clinic Serving the Homeless

Ballroom

Purpose

The Johnson City Downtown Day Center (JCDDC) provides integrated inter-professional primary care, mental health, and social work case management services to homeless and under-served persons who have difficulty accessing traditional systems. Because of the exponential rise in substance abuse in the Appalachian region, the JCDDC providers and staff initiated SBIRT as recommended standard of care, as endorsed by SAMHSA, United States Public Health Services Task Force, and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. The JCDDC has two mechanisms by which patients can choose to participate in substance abuse treatment: SMART Recovery, and psychiatric nurse practitioner (NP) referrals. The purpose of the project evaluates use of SBIRT at the JCDDC by determining process of (1) referral and (2) follow-up rates of those who received SBIRT; analyzing outcomes by measuring numbers of: (1) screens administered; (2) brief interventions; (3) positive screens; (4) referrals to either SMART Recovery or to the psychiatric NP; (5) participation in one follow-up.

Review of Literature:

Approximately 6.4 million people, or 2.4% of the U.S. population 12 years and older, currently misuse prescription medications. There is an undeniable and tangible correlation between the chronic disease of substance use disorder and unstable housing or homelessness (de Chesnay & Anderson, 2016). Similarly, substance use disorder was found to be much more common in people facing homelessness than in people who had stable housing (National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has been the most significant funding source for SBIRT proliferation in the United States. Despite a demonstrated need for substance abuse services among this vulnerable population, people who are homeless have substantially greater barriers to obtaining treatment and often go without.

Summary of Innovation or Practice

The current SBIRT process includes use of DAST-10 and AUDIT tools. Evaluating clinic processes and outcomes in vulnerable populations who have inconsistent erratic follow-up is challenging. However, new ways of understanding patterns and incremental outcomes is essential to addressing clinic practice that can impact outcomes in vulnerable groups.

Implications for NPs

The heterogeneity of the homeless population is often precipitated by a host of complicating factors including co-occurring mental illness, multiple chronic conditions, unstable income, and lack of transportation. Therefore, the importance of finding effective, cost-conscious processes that are population specific and patient-centered is essential for future research and policy. The inter-professional model of care also informs future practice by evaluating the feasibility of administering all of the elements of SBIRT in a single facility.