Project Title

Peeling away the layers to anemia

Authors' Affiliations

Dr. Alice Luo, Dr. Joseph Maguire, Dr. Manisha Nukavarapu, and Dr. Ashokkumar Gaba, Department of Internal Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee

Location

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

157

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Ashokkumar Gaba

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Internal Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical Case Study

Abstract Text

Anemia is a significant public health issue that affects a great number of people in developed and developing countries. The World Health Organization states when the Hb value is/dL in an adult male and/dL in a nonpregnant female, the individual is considered as anemic. Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. Inadequate intake of iron, chronic blood loss, and/or a combination of both factors typically lead to iron deficiency anemia. In developed countries, chronic blood loss from gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and gynecological sources are the most common etiologies of iron deficiency anemia. Although there are reports of iron deficiency anemia leading to self-inflicted skin excoriation, there are few cases of chronic blood loss from skin excoriation resulting in severe iron deficiency anemia. We present a 49 year old female with significant past medical history of depression, anxiety and chronic back pain who presented after she was found to have profound anemia with hemoglobin of 4.1g/dl. During interviewing, she denied hematuria, hemoptysis, hematochezia, and had been without menstrual cycles for the past year. Urinalysis was negative for blood as well as two documented negative fecal occult blood tests. Iron studies completed showed severely reduced iron levels. Upon further interviewing, the patient reported a supposedly self-diagnosed keratin disorder. For the past ten years she has been self-treating the keratin disorder by applying topical tretinoin and then wrapping it in saran wrap. She would then peel off areas of skin over multiple areas of her body including all extremities and her face. Multiple pictures of bloody piles of tissue were shown. The patient required 3 units of packed red blood cells and was started on iron supplementation. Gastroenterology was consulted and agreed there was no GI source of her blood loss. Psychiatry further evaluated the patient and diagnosed her with obsessive-compulsive disorder with somatic delusions. The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatric patients is more frequent than general population. This coexistence deteriorates the quality of life of the patients, prolongs the psychiatric treatment period, and could even cause an increase in morbidity and mortality. Treatment-related factors, drugs taken, physical conditions, negative lifestyle habits, and nutritional disorders are the reasons for anemia among chronic psychiatric patients. Even though iron deficiency anemia in developed country is most often caused by chronic blood loss from gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and gynecological causes, it is important to evaluate for other factors when none of these are present. Psychiatric causes when warranted from history including somatic delusions from obsessive-compulsive disorder should be considered on the differential when other etiologies are less clear.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Peeling away the layers to anemia

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Anemia is a significant public health issue that affects a great number of people in developed and developing countries. The World Health Organization states when the Hb value is/dL in an adult male and/dL in a nonpregnant female, the individual is considered as anemic. Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. Inadequate intake of iron, chronic blood loss, and/or a combination of both factors typically lead to iron deficiency anemia. In developed countries, chronic blood loss from gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and gynecological sources are the most common etiologies of iron deficiency anemia. Although there are reports of iron deficiency anemia leading to self-inflicted skin excoriation, there are few cases of chronic blood loss from skin excoriation resulting in severe iron deficiency anemia. We present a 49 year old female with significant past medical history of depression, anxiety and chronic back pain who presented after she was found to have profound anemia with hemoglobin of 4.1g/dl. During interviewing, she denied hematuria, hemoptysis, hematochezia, and had been without menstrual cycles for the past year. Urinalysis was negative for blood as well as two documented negative fecal occult blood tests. Iron studies completed showed severely reduced iron levels. Upon further interviewing, the patient reported a supposedly self-diagnosed keratin disorder. For the past ten years she has been self-treating the keratin disorder by applying topical tretinoin and then wrapping it in saran wrap. She would then peel off areas of skin over multiple areas of her body including all extremities and her face. Multiple pictures of bloody piles of tissue were shown. The patient required 3 units of packed red blood cells and was started on iron supplementation. Gastroenterology was consulted and agreed there was no GI source of her blood loss. Psychiatry further evaluated the patient and diagnosed her with obsessive-compulsive disorder with somatic delusions. The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatric patients is more frequent than general population. This coexistence deteriorates the quality of life of the patients, prolongs the psychiatric treatment period, and could even cause an increase in morbidity and mortality. Treatment-related factors, drugs taken, physical conditions, negative lifestyle habits, and nutritional disorders are the reasons for anemia among chronic psychiatric patients. Even though iron deficiency anemia in developed country is most often caused by chronic blood loss from gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and gynecological causes, it is important to evaluate for other factors when none of these are present. Psychiatric causes when warranted from history including somatic delusions from obsessive-compulsive disorder should be considered on the differential when other etiologies are less clear.