Project Title

Artificial urinary sphincter reservoir related complication masquerading as colonic neoplasm

Authors' Affiliations

1. Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 2. Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 3. Medical Student, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 4. Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

153

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Rupal Shah

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Internal Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical Case Study

Abstract Text

Artificial urinary sphincters have been used for decades for treatment of urinary incontinence. A commonly used device, the AMS 800 consists of a urethral cuff, pump and an abdominal reservoir. Notable complications of this system include scrotal or labial hematomas, infection or erosion of the cuff and rarely migration of its components. Although there are few reported cases related to effects from pump migration, those documenting reservoir related complications are even rarer. We present a case of reservoir migration adjacent to the ascending colon causing ischemic changes mimicking colonic neoplasm. Our patient, a 66-year old male with medical history of adenocarcinoma of prostate status post radical prostatectomy, had been having abdominal pain for a month. A CT scan showed cecal and proximal ascending colonic irregular nodular thickening suggestive of colonic mass. It also revealed a low-density structure next to the ascending colon abutting into area of the mass. A follow up colonoscopy showed a fungating, ulcerated mass extending from cecum to ascending colon concerning for a malignancy of which biopsy was also done. The patient then underwent right open hemicolectomy. During surgery, a balloon reservoir was seen in the abdominal cavity with its adherence to the right colon but not eroding into it. The surgeon dissected the balloon, repositioned and re-peritonealized it before closing the abdomen. The colonoscopic and surgical pathology instead demonstrated findings of ischemic colitis with mucosal ulceration in cecum and ascending colon limited to the mucosa but no evidence of cancer. Retrospective chart review revealed history of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for urinary incontinence related to radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma eight years prior. With manufacturer suggested implant location of the reservoir in prevesical space, the possibility of migration needs to be accounted for. Although there are not many reports of artificial sphincter reservoir related complications, there are cases documenting inflatable penile prosthesis reservoir erosion into abdominal and pelvic structures. As the CT scan demonstrated reservoir indentation into the ascending colon, it likely led to chronic irritation of the adjacent colonic wall due to mass effect. It is hypothesized that constant pressure on colonic wall likely led to localized ischemia. This resulted in localized inflammation including submucosal edema, which can create a mass-like appearance when severe. This case emphasizes that, while preliminary radiographic imaging and even gross colonoscopy findings may be suggestive of a malignancy, it is imperative to await biopsy results to confirm the diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm. Our case report emphasizes the consideration of diagnoses other than colon cancer when faced with a colonic mass especially in the setting of implanted intra-abdominal foreign body to avoid unnecessary surgery and related complications.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Artificial urinary sphincter reservoir related complication masquerading as colonic neoplasm

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Artificial urinary sphincters have been used for decades for treatment of urinary incontinence. A commonly used device, the AMS 800 consists of a urethral cuff, pump and an abdominal reservoir. Notable complications of this system include scrotal or labial hematomas, infection or erosion of the cuff and rarely migration of its components. Although there are few reported cases related to effects from pump migration, those documenting reservoir related complications are even rarer. We present a case of reservoir migration adjacent to the ascending colon causing ischemic changes mimicking colonic neoplasm. Our patient, a 66-year old male with medical history of adenocarcinoma of prostate status post radical prostatectomy, had been having abdominal pain for a month. A CT scan showed cecal and proximal ascending colonic irregular nodular thickening suggestive of colonic mass. It also revealed a low-density structure next to the ascending colon abutting into area of the mass. A follow up colonoscopy showed a fungating, ulcerated mass extending from cecum to ascending colon concerning for a malignancy of which biopsy was also done. The patient then underwent right open hemicolectomy. During surgery, a balloon reservoir was seen in the abdominal cavity with its adherence to the right colon but not eroding into it. The surgeon dissected the balloon, repositioned and re-peritonealized it before closing the abdomen. The colonoscopic and surgical pathology instead demonstrated findings of ischemic colitis with mucosal ulceration in cecum and ascending colon limited to the mucosa but no evidence of cancer. Retrospective chart review revealed history of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for urinary incontinence related to radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma eight years prior. With manufacturer suggested implant location of the reservoir in prevesical space, the possibility of migration needs to be accounted for. Although there are not many reports of artificial sphincter reservoir related complications, there are cases documenting inflatable penile prosthesis reservoir erosion into abdominal and pelvic structures. As the CT scan demonstrated reservoir indentation into the ascending colon, it likely led to chronic irritation of the adjacent colonic wall due to mass effect. It is hypothesized that constant pressure on colonic wall likely led to localized ischemia. This resulted in localized inflammation including submucosal edema, which can create a mass-like appearance when severe. This case emphasizes that, while preliminary radiographic imaging and even gross colonoscopy findings may be suggestive of a malignancy, it is imperative to await biopsy results to confirm the diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm. Our case report emphasizes the consideration of diagnoses other than colon cancer when faced with a colonic mass especially in the setting of implanted intra-abdominal foreign body to avoid unnecessary surgery and related complications.