Authors' Affiliations

Taylor Cox, Claire Gleadhill, William Seagrave, Coty Cooper and Anthony DeLucia, PhD, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Alantis Hunt and Kelly Mitchell, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Randy Byington, Ed.D., M.B.A., MT (ASCP), College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

81

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Anthony DeLucia

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Surgery, James H. Quillen College of Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Student

Project's Category

Education and Learning

Abstract Text

Little Milligan Elementary School in rural Carter County, Tennessee was provided with health literacy resources in the form of health education Go-Packs––easily implementable lessons contained in a small storage tote––as part of the community project requirement of the James H. Quillen College of Medicine Rural Primary Care Track Curriculum. These Go-Packs included detailed lesson plans and accompanying materials that were designed to facilitate health education in the classrooms by providing easily deployable lessons for the teachers to utilize. Four Go-Packs were provided for hygiene, oral health, tobacco use, and nutrition that teachers used to augment instruction during teachable moments that arose in their classrooms. Our objective was to determine whether the development and implementation of these Go-Packs increased the amount of health education delivered to the students and determine what barriers persist to provide health education in the classroom. Participants were randomly assigned a number which they placed on their pre and post surveys. A focus group was also conducted to better understand the faculty’s experience utilizing the Go-Packs and where improvements could be made. A paired sample t-test showed no significant differences in pre and post attitudes of teachers at the school. The focus group and survey questions identified the need to improve the usability of specific Go-Packs, map the Go-Packs to state mandated curriculums and target Go-Pack usage towards non-core instructors.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Promoting Health Education and Literacy in Rural Tennessee: The Go-Packs Pilot Project

Ballroom

Little Milligan Elementary School in rural Carter County, Tennessee was provided with health literacy resources in the form of health education Go-Packs––easily implementable lessons contained in a small storage tote––as part of the community project requirement of the James H. Quillen College of Medicine Rural Primary Care Track Curriculum. These Go-Packs included detailed lesson plans and accompanying materials that were designed to facilitate health education in the classrooms by providing easily deployable lessons for the teachers to utilize. Four Go-Packs were provided for hygiene, oral health, tobacco use, and nutrition that teachers used to augment instruction during teachable moments that arose in their classrooms. Our objective was to determine whether the development and implementation of these Go-Packs increased the amount of health education delivered to the students and determine what barriers persist to provide health education in the classroom. Participants were randomly assigned a number which they placed on their pre and post surveys. A focus group was also conducted to better understand the faculty’s experience utilizing the Go-Packs and where improvements could be made. A paired sample t-test showed no significant differences in pre and post attitudes of teachers at the school. The focus group and survey questions identified the need to improve the usability of specific Go-Packs, map the Go-Packs to state mandated curriculums and target Go-Pack usage towards non-core instructors.