Project Title

Streptococcus Pneumoniae Bacteremia in a Late Preterm Infant

Authors' Affiliations

Dr. Brittany Anibal and Dr. Demetrio Macariola, Department of Pediatrics, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

143

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Demetrio Macariola

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Pediatrics

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical Case Study

Abstract Text

Neonatal sepsis is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. There are two distinct types of sepsis- early and late onset. Group B streptococcus and Listeria are the most common causes of early onset neonatal sepsis historically. Physicians select antibiotics for neonates with fever based on historically common bacterial pathogens such as GBS, Ecoli, Listeria, and Staphylococcal aureus. However, the landscape of bacterial pathogens causing sepsis and fever in neonates seems to be changing. This could potentially change the first choice of antibiotics for this susceptible population.

In this case study, we will present early-onset sepsis in a late preterm infant due to Streptococcus pneumoniae as confirmed by blood culture. The only maternal risk factors present in this case for septicemia were delivery less than 37 weeks. Patient initially had respiratory distress at delivery and required CPAP for 3 days. On day 2 of life, cultures were taken due to acute deterioration. Ampicillin and Gentamycin were given to the patient for empiric coverage initially. On day 2 of antibiotics, cultures were reported positive. Patient’s antibiotics had to be altered at that time to cover the isolated organism. The patient was inadequately treated up until cultures were positive. This case raises the question if Ampicillin and Gentamycin remain the best choice for broad antibiotic coverage in neonates with possible sepsis.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Streptococcus Pneumoniae Bacteremia in a Late Preterm Infant

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Neonatal sepsis is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. There are two distinct types of sepsis- early and late onset. Group B streptococcus and Listeria are the most common causes of early onset neonatal sepsis historically. Physicians select antibiotics for neonates with fever based on historically common bacterial pathogens such as GBS, Ecoli, Listeria, and Staphylococcal aureus. However, the landscape of bacterial pathogens causing sepsis and fever in neonates seems to be changing. This could potentially change the first choice of antibiotics for this susceptible population.

In this case study, we will present early-onset sepsis in a late preterm infant due to Streptococcus pneumoniae as confirmed by blood culture. The only maternal risk factors present in this case for septicemia were delivery less than 37 weeks. Patient initially had respiratory distress at delivery and required CPAP for 3 days. On day 2 of life, cultures were taken due to acute deterioration. Ampicillin and Gentamycin were given to the patient for empiric coverage initially. On day 2 of antibiotics, cultures were reported positive. Patient’s antibiotics had to be altered at that time to cover the isolated organism. The patient was inadequately treated up until cultures were positive. This case raises the question if Ampicillin and Gentamycin remain the best choice for broad antibiotic coverage in neonates with possible sepsis.