Project Title

Mom Power: Replanting the seed

Authors' Affiliations

Rebecca Otwell, BA & Diana Morelen, PhD, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 2:15 PM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Diana Morelen

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Psychology

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

MOM POWER: REPLANTING THE SEED

Rebecca Otwell, BA & Diana Morelen, PhD, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Mom Power is a trauma-informed parenting intervention which aims to break the intergenerational transmission of risk by promoting enhanced parent-child attachment, increased social support, connection to community services, and utilization of self-care skills. Mom Power was developed to reach vulnerable families (e.g., mothers with trauma histories, low income, single mothers) and seeks to mitigate the barriers to access common for underserved populations through providing childcare, transportation assistance, and a trauma-informed and culturally sensitive milieu. This is a 10-week group (n = 8 mother-child dyads) with three individual check-in meetings, the first and last of which serve as collection points for pre- and post-group data. Mom Power was developed in Michigan and is currently being disseminated in Tennessee for the first time. Despite the novel nature of this intervention in Tennessee, data from its initial implementation in Michigan provides ample support for expected, positive outcomes from participation in current groups. In its pilot Tennessee implementation, Mom Power participants are 16 mother-child dyads from the local Tri-Cities area all referred by community resource partners. This presentation will summarize the Mom Power treatment model, briefly summarize the randomized control trial data from Michigan, describe the characteristics of the mothers served in the Tennessee pilot study (e.g., adverse childhood experiences score, depression, anxiety, income), and share preliminary findings for pre/post changes in maternal depression, maternal emotion regulation, maternal PTSD symptomology, and perceived stress. Improvements in these areas would have significant, subsequent implications for improvement of the mother-child experience and early intervention in the potential intergenerational transmission of risk, as well as for the effective implementation of Mom Power in the state of Tennessee.

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Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 2:15 PM

Mom Power: Replanting the seed

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

MOM POWER: REPLANTING THE SEED

Rebecca Otwell, BA & Diana Morelen, PhD, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Mom Power is a trauma-informed parenting intervention which aims to break the intergenerational transmission of risk by promoting enhanced parent-child attachment, increased social support, connection to community services, and utilization of self-care skills. Mom Power was developed to reach vulnerable families (e.g., mothers with trauma histories, low income, single mothers) and seeks to mitigate the barriers to access common for underserved populations through providing childcare, transportation assistance, and a trauma-informed and culturally sensitive milieu. This is a 10-week group (n = 8 mother-child dyads) with three individual check-in meetings, the first and last of which serve as collection points for pre- and post-group data. Mom Power was developed in Michigan and is currently being disseminated in Tennessee for the first time. Despite the novel nature of this intervention in Tennessee, data from its initial implementation in Michigan provides ample support for expected, positive outcomes from participation in current groups. In its pilot Tennessee implementation, Mom Power participants are 16 mother-child dyads from the local Tri-Cities area all referred by community resource partners. This presentation will summarize the Mom Power treatment model, briefly summarize the randomized control trial data from Michigan, describe the characteristics of the mothers served in the Tennessee pilot study (e.g., adverse childhood experiences score, depression, anxiety, income), and share preliminary findings for pre/post changes in maternal depression, maternal emotion regulation, maternal PTSD symptomology, and perceived stress. Improvements in these areas would have significant, subsequent implications for improvement of the mother-child experience and early intervention in the potential intergenerational transmission of risk, as well as for the effective implementation of Mom Power in the state of Tennessee.