Authors' Affiliations

Beenish Kamran, Dr. Deborah Slawson, and LeighAnne, MPH, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, and Dr. Kate Beatty, Department of Health Service Management and Policy, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137A

Start Date

4-4-2018 1:20 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 1:35 PM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Deborah Slawson

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Community and Behavioral Health

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has increased greatly in incidence in the United States over the past decade. Diagnosis of T2DM is typically preceded by insulin resistance, which is typically indicated by increases in fasting blood sugar and called pre-diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a group-based program focused on improving diet and maintaining consistent exercise towards a lower body weight. It has been found that minimum weight loss and 150 minutes of moderate exercise is more effective at preventing T2DM than medication-based treatment. Therefore, the DPP has potential in preventing T2DM however currently faces obstacles concerning recruitment and retention. Unfortunately, only 1-5% of individuals who would benefit from the program actually sign up. In order to address this, researchers obtained RDC funding and partnered with YMCA to determine barriers and motivators to the DPP. Individuals were invited to an on-campus, pilot DPP aimed towards employees in a single building. All employees received an invitation to give feedback in 1 of 3 focus groups: 1 with those who joined the program and 2 with employees who did not join. There were 4 individuals in the focus group for DPP participants and 18 total who attended the other focus groups (one group of 5, and one group of 13). The focus group for current participants was scheduled during the time of a normal weekly meeting, while the group for non-DPP participants was during lunchtime. Questions centered around individuals' perceptions on wellness programs, barriers to participation, and recommendations. Thematic analysis was done on notes taken at each focus group. Motivators found in the focus group with DPP participants included family history of diabetes, weight loss, desire to take control of lifestyle, hearing success stories, and support from others. A challenge faced by individuals going through the program included unsupportive family members or home environment. Themes found among the non-DPP participant focus groups gave greater insight in the negatives and barriers to wellness programs. Themes emphasized included importance of convenience, variability, coworker support, and appealing to individual interests. Overlapping themes included convenience, coworker support, and the importance of steering away from the 'diabetes' or 'prediabetic' labels. This study has significant impact especially in Tennessee where the DPP has become a covered benefit under insurance. In order to ensure strong recruitment and retention of these programs across the state and nation, researching further and addressing the motivators and barriers identified is key. With the DPP having such great potential in reducing risk of diabetes and obesity, a strong, intentional recruitment plan is necessary.

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Apr 4th, 1:20 PM Apr 4th, 1:35 PM

Identifying Motivators and Barriers for Wellness Programs to Inform Recruitment and Retention of Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPPs)

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137A

Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has increased greatly in incidence in the United States over the past decade. Diagnosis of T2DM is typically preceded by insulin resistance, which is typically indicated by increases in fasting blood sugar and called pre-diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a group-based program focused on improving diet and maintaining consistent exercise towards a lower body weight. It has been found that minimum weight loss and 150 minutes of moderate exercise is more effective at preventing T2DM than medication-based treatment. Therefore, the DPP has potential in preventing T2DM however currently faces obstacles concerning recruitment and retention. Unfortunately, only 1-5% of individuals who would benefit from the program actually sign up. In order to address this, researchers obtained RDC funding and partnered with YMCA to determine barriers and motivators to the DPP. Individuals were invited to an on-campus, pilot DPP aimed towards employees in a single building. All employees received an invitation to give feedback in 1 of 3 focus groups: 1 with those who joined the program and 2 with employees who did not join. There were 4 individuals in the focus group for DPP participants and 18 total who attended the other focus groups (one group of 5, and one group of 13). The focus group for current participants was scheduled during the time of a normal weekly meeting, while the group for non-DPP participants was during lunchtime. Questions centered around individuals' perceptions on wellness programs, barriers to participation, and recommendations. Thematic analysis was done on notes taken at each focus group. Motivators found in the focus group with DPP participants included family history of diabetes, weight loss, desire to take control of lifestyle, hearing success stories, and support from others. A challenge faced by individuals going through the program included unsupportive family members or home environment. Themes found among the non-DPP participant focus groups gave greater insight in the negatives and barriers to wellness programs. Themes emphasized included importance of convenience, variability, coworker support, and appealing to individual interests. Overlapping themes included convenience, coworker support, and the importance of steering away from the 'diabetes' or 'prediabetic' labels. This study has significant impact especially in Tennessee where the DPP has become a covered benefit under insurance. In order to ensure strong recruitment and retention of these programs across the state and nation, researching further and addressing the motivators and barriers identified is key. With the DPP having such great potential in reducing risk of diabetes and obesity, a strong, intentional recruitment plan is necessary.