Project Title

Characterization of SIP470, A Plant Lipid Transfer Protein, and its Role in Plant Defense Signaling

Authors' Affiliations

1Shantaya Andrews, 2Timothy Audam, and 1Dhirendra Kumar 1Department of Biological Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202

Location

BAYS MTN. ROOM 125

Start Date

4-4-2018 1:20 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 1:35 PM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Dhirendra Kumar

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Biological Sciences

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Natural Sciences

Abstract Text

Plants are resilient organisms that are continually evolving and continue to withstand an adverse and dynamic world. SABP2-interacting protein (SIP)-470 is a non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) that was identified in tobacco. SIP470 was discovered during a yeast two-hybrid screening with SABP2, which is an important methyl esterase enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of immobile MeSA into active salicylic acid (SA) during pathogenic challenge. SA activation and mobility allows for immunity to be carried to other, non-infected parts of the plant. This induced responses is called systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and it is a broad spectrum defense. Like many nsLTPs, SIP470 is small and has a predicted characteristic hydrophobic cavity. nsLTPs are found in higher plants and have repeatedly demonstrated protection in biotic stress including disease resistance, and greater resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens in overexpressed transgenic lines. This diverse class is also significantly involved in plant adaptation to environmental changes, namely drought, salinity, and freezing, but also in osmotic stress and wounding. Furthermore, nsLTPs are involved in wax metabolism and seed development. Subcellular localization of nsLTPs varies considerably during in vitro and in recent in vivo studies. SIP470 was originally identified in tobacco plants, and therefore, it is important to study its role directly in tobacco plants. SIP470 and eGFP fusion construct has been generated to study the subcellular localization of SIP470 in tobacco cells. SIP470 localization has shown a discontinuous, punctate arrangement around the membrane periphery which is being further verified by subcellular fractionation. Transgenic tobacco lines that are silenced in SIP470 via RNAi have been generated, and these plants are being screened. Overexpressor transgenic lines of SIP470 have been generated and are under the control of an estradiol-inducible promoter. These transgenic lines will be tested for their response in basal resistance and SAR.

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Apr 4th, 1:20 PM Apr 4th, 1:35 PM

Characterization of SIP470, A Plant Lipid Transfer Protein, and its Role in Plant Defense Signaling

BAYS MTN. ROOM 125

Plants are resilient organisms that are continually evolving and continue to withstand an adverse and dynamic world. SABP2-interacting protein (SIP)-470 is a non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) that was identified in tobacco. SIP470 was discovered during a yeast two-hybrid screening with SABP2, which is an important methyl esterase enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of immobile MeSA into active salicylic acid (SA) during pathogenic challenge. SA activation and mobility allows for immunity to be carried to other, non-infected parts of the plant. This induced responses is called systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and it is a broad spectrum defense. Like many nsLTPs, SIP470 is small and has a predicted characteristic hydrophobic cavity. nsLTPs are found in higher plants and have repeatedly demonstrated protection in biotic stress including disease resistance, and greater resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens in overexpressed transgenic lines. This diverse class is also significantly involved in plant adaptation to environmental changes, namely drought, salinity, and freezing, but also in osmotic stress and wounding. Furthermore, nsLTPs are involved in wax metabolism and seed development. Subcellular localization of nsLTPs varies considerably during in vitro and in recent in vivo studies. SIP470 was originally identified in tobacco plants, and therefore, it is important to study its role directly in tobacco plants. SIP470 and eGFP fusion construct has been generated to study the subcellular localization of SIP470 in tobacco cells. SIP470 localization has shown a discontinuous, punctate arrangement around the membrane periphery which is being further verified by subcellular fractionation. Transgenic tobacco lines that are silenced in SIP470 via RNAi have been generated, and these plants are being screened. Overexpressor transgenic lines of SIP470 have been generated and are under the control of an estradiol-inducible promoter. These transgenic lines will be tested for their response in basal resistance and SAR.