Project Title

Geostatistical Approach to Delineate Wetland Boundaries in the Cutshaw Bog, Tennessee

Authors' Affiliations

Victoria Anderson , Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Isaac Shockley , Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Dr. Arpita Nandi , Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN Dr. Ingrid Luffman , Department of Geosciences, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

12

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Arpita Nandi

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Geosciences

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Natural Sciences

Abstract Text

Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing a range of services, including: water quality improvement, flood mitigation, erosion control, habitat, and carbon storage. It is estimated that Tennessee has lost 60% of its original 2 million acres of pre-European settlement wetlands. Recently, increased funding has been made available for wetland restoration and expansion. In response, the Cherokee National Forest has proposed a range of wetland restoration actions within the Paint Creek Watershed to expand and restore some of the existing bogs and fens, including the Cutshaw Bog, a 163,864 m2 wetland located 32 km south of Greeneville, TN. The U.S. Forest Service has proposed a new expanded wetland boundary to result from restoration efforts. However, to assess the potential for success, current wetland indicators based on soil color, texture, depth, drainage, sulfide materials, and iron concentrations were examined. Sampling locations were identified by overlaying a grid, composed of 64 cells, each 40.5 meter by 40.5 meter in size. Soil cores were extracted up to a depth of 0.6 meters from each sampling cell and evaluated in situ for hydric soil properties using the Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Army Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. Soil physical (texture, bulk density, moisture content) and chemical (pH, cation exchange capacity, % base saturation, Nitrogen, Bray II Phosphorus, Iron, Zinc, and Total Carbon Content) properties were evaluated in the laboratory. Results indicated 47% of samples taken within the proposed wetland expansion area currently have hydric soil characteristics and were located along drainage lines. Presence of hydric soils was correlated with soil physicochemical properties including bulk density, moisture content, sulfur and phosphorus concentrations, iron, and other metals. Statistical analyses for the northern section and southern section of the bog were completed separately, as they were physically divided by a French drain structure. Logistic regression models were developed using properties most strongly correlated with the presence of hydric soil. For the northern section, bulk density and iron were retained in the model, while for the southern section, iron was retained. A spatial model for the presence of hydric soil was developed by spatially interpolating the covariates through kriging. Next, a probability map was created from the logistic regression equation with raster math in ArcGIS Pro. Results indicate that Cutshaw Bog’s area cannot be expanded to the original proposed boundary provided by the US Forest Service and a new recommended boundary was delineated from the probability map. The results of this data driven approach will assist the Forest Service in targeted wetland restoration efforts at the Cutshaw Bog.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Geostatistical Approach to Delineate Wetland Boundaries in the Cutshaw Bog, Tennessee

Ballroom

Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing a range of services, including: water quality improvement, flood mitigation, erosion control, habitat, and carbon storage. It is estimated that Tennessee has lost 60% of its original 2 million acres of pre-European settlement wetlands. Recently, increased funding has been made available for wetland restoration and expansion. In response, the Cherokee National Forest has proposed a range of wetland restoration actions within the Paint Creek Watershed to expand and restore some of the existing bogs and fens, including the Cutshaw Bog, a 163,864 m2 wetland located 32 km south of Greeneville, TN. The U.S. Forest Service has proposed a new expanded wetland boundary to result from restoration efforts. However, to assess the potential for success, current wetland indicators based on soil color, texture, depth, drainage, sulfide materials, and iron concentrations were examined. Sampling locations were identified by overlaying a grid, composed of 64 cells, each 40.5 meter by 40.5 meter in size. Soil cores were extracted up to a depth of 0.6 meters from each sampling cell and evaluated in situ for hydric soil properties using the Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Army Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. Soil physical (texture, bulk density, moisture content) and chemical (pH, cation exchange capacity, % base saturation, Nitrogen, Bray II Phosphorus, Iron, Zinc, and Total Carbon Content) properties were evaluated in the laboratory. Results indicated 47% of samples taken within the proposed wetland expansion area currently have hydric soil characteristics and were located along drainage lines. Presence of hydric soils was correlated with soil physicochemical properties including bulk density, moisture content, sulfur and phosphorus concentrations, iron, and other metals. Statistical analyses for the northern section and southern section of the bog were completed separately, as they were physically divided by a French drain structure. Logistic regression models were developed using properties most strongly correlated with the presence of hydric soil. For the northern section, bulk density and iron were retained in the model, while for the southern section, iron was retained. A spatial model for the presence of hydric soil was developed by spatially interpolating the covariates through kriging. Next, a probability map was created from the logistic regression equation with raster math in ArcGIS Pro. Results indicate that Cutshaw Bog’s area cannot be expanded to the original proposed boundary provided by the US Forest Service and a new recommended boundary was delineated from the probability map. The results of this data driven approach will assist the Forest Service in targeted wetland restoration efforts at the Cutshaw Bog.