Project Title

Association of E-Cigarette Use with Coronary Heart Disease Among U.S. Adults

Authors' Affiliations

Abir Rahman, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Sreenivas Veeranki Premier Applied Sciences, Premier Inc., Charlotte, NC. and University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Galveston, TX Olushola Fapo Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 Shimin Zheng Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

113

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Shimin Zheng

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Biostatistics and Epidemiology

Type

Poster: Non-Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Background: Smoking continues to be the leading cause of preventable disease, disability and death in the United States attributing to more than 480,000 deaths every year. An estimated 36.5 million US adults (15% of US population) currently smoke, and more than 16 million live with a smoking-related disease. Since recent years, there has been a surge of alternate tobacco products in the US markets, and one such product that has gained importance was electronic cigarettes. Studies have demonstrated a rapid increase in e-cigarette use among US adults. However, research is limited on the effects of e-cigarette on human health. Thus, using a nationally representative sample of US adults, we investigated the association of e-cigarette use with coronary heart disease (CHD) among adults aged ≥18-years in the US.

Methods: Data from the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used to conduct this study. BRFSS is a cross-sectional survey administered to 486,303 adults in all 50 states to collect information about their health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions and the use of preventive services. Participants’ self-reported responses were used to define study outcome (CHD), exposure (current e-cigarette use) and covariates (demographics [sex and race], behaviors [cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, marijuana use, physical activity], and physical conditions [overweight or obesity]). Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the association between e-cigarette use and CHD. Adjusted odds ratio and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were presented.

Results: Approximately 6.19% of US adults reported CHD events and 3.1% of US adults were current e-cigarette users. Approximately 5.42% of e-cigarette smoking US adults reported CHD outcomes in 2016. Overall, the odds of CHD events was 34.9% less among e-cigarette users than those who were not e-cigarette users (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-0.70, p

Conclusion: The study found out that e-cigarette user was less likely associated with CHD outcomes in US adults. Given the limitations of cross-sectional study nature and self-reported bias of responses, longitudinal studies with objective measures are needed to further investigate the association between e-cigarette use and CHD.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Association of E-Cigarette Use with Coronary Heart Disease Among U.S. Adults

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Background: Smoking continues to be the leading cause of preventable disease, disability and death in the United States attributing to more than 480,000 deaths every year. An estimated 36.5 million US adults (15% of US population) currently smoke, and more than 16 million live with a smoking-related disease. Since recent years, there has been a surge of alternate tobacco products in the US markets, and one such product that has gained importance was electronic cigarettes. Studies have demonstrated a rapid increase in e-cigarette use among US adults. However, research is limited on the effects of e-cigarette on human health. Thus, using a nationally representative sample of US adults, we investigated the association of e-cigarette use with coronary heart disease (CHD) among adults aged ≥18-years in the US.

Methods: Data from the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used to conduct this study. BRFSS is a cross-sectional survey administered to 486,303 adults in all 50 states to collect information about their health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions and the use of preventive services. Participants’ self-reported responses were used to define study outcome (CHD), exposure (current e-cigarette use) and covariates (demographics [sex and race], behaviors [cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, marijuana use, physical activity], and physical conditions [overweight or obesity]). Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the association between e-cigarette use and CHD. Adjusted odds ratio and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were presented.

Results: Approximately 6.19% of US adults reported CHD events and 3.1% of US adults were current e-cigarette users. Approximately 5.42% of e-cigarette smoking US adults reported CHD outcomes in 2016. Overall, the odds of CHD events was 34.9% less among e-cigarette users than those who were not e-cigarette users (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-0.70, p

Conclusion: The study found out that e-cigarette user was less likely associated with CHD outcomes in US adults. Given the limitations of cross-sectional study nature and self-reported bias of responses, longitudinal studies with objective measures are needed to further investigate the association between e-cigarette use and CHD.