Authors' Affiliations

Kido Uyamasi, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, ETSU Sheryl Strasser, School of Public Health, Georgia State University Shimmin Zheng, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, ETSU

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137A

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:40 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 2:55 PM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Shimmin Zheng

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Biostatics and Epidemiology

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

Background: Obesity is a complex health issue, which results from the interaction between many determinants: genetics, physical environments, society, economy, and culture. Data indicate that about 19% of American children (2 to 19 years) have obesity, a condition that considerably affects physical and mental health and that usually continues into adulthood. Aside from its direct physical and mental effects, there is strong evidence that childhood obesity is strongly associated with early onset and adult cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Family and parental factors, which have both genetics and environmental components, have long been implicated in previous research as major forces in the development of childhood obesity. This study delved deeper into the relationship between family and parental factors and childhood obesity.

Methods: Data examined in this study is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Survey for Child Health collected during 2013-2015. In total, 42,121 subjects were included in this representative sample. Multiple logistic regression models were run to determine association between family and parental factors (access to the children’s health insurance programs (CHIP), low birth weight (LBW), poverty, family size, and location of residence) with obesity (defined as a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile for the same age and sex). The model was adjusted for possible confounders such as demographics (age, sex and race) and emotional status. SAS v 9.4 was used for analysis.

Results: After adjusting for all covariates, there was a significant association determined between childhood obesity and CHIP, poverty, LBW, the number of children in a family and family location. The odds of being obese decreased significantly with an increase in the number of children in each family (Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) (OR): 0.877 (0.875-0.879), P

Conclusion: Family and parental factors such as access to CHIP, family poverty, family size, LBW and location heavily affect the prevalence of childhood obesity in America. Further studies are needed to understand how family structure, dynamics, and parental influences impact rates of obesity in children.

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Apr 4th, 2:40 PM Apr 4th, 2:55 PM

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN FAMILY AND PARENTAL FACTORS AND CHILDHOOD OBESITY

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137A

Background: Obesity is a complex health issue, which results from the interaction between many determinants: genetics, physical environments, society, economy, and culture. Data indicate that about 19% of American children (2 to 19 years) have obesity, a condition that considerably affects physical and mental health and that usually continues into adulthood. Aside from its direct physical and mental effects, there is strong evidence that childhood obesity is strongly associated with early onset and adult cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Family and parental factors, which have both genetics and environmental components, have long been implicated in previous research as major forces in the development of childhood obesity. This study delved deeper into the relationship between family and parental factors and childhood obesity.

Methods: Data examined in this study is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Survey for Child Health collected during 2013-2015. In total, 42,121 subjects were included in this representative sample. Multiple logistic regression models were run to determine association between family and parental factors (access to the children’s health insurance programs (CHIP), low birth weight (LBW), poverty, family size, and location of residence) with obesity (defined as a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile for the same age and sex). The model was adjusted for possible confounders such as demographics (age, sex and race) and emotional status. SAS v 9.4 was used for analysis.

Results: After adjusting for all covariates, there was a significant association determined between childhood obesity and CHIP, poverty, LBW, the number of children in a family and family location. The odds of being obese decreased significantly with an increase in the number of children in each family (Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) (OR): 0.877 (0.875-0.879), P

Conclusion: Family and parental factors such as access to CHIP, family poverty, family size, LBW and location heavily affect the prevalence of childhood obesity in America. Further studies are needed to understand how family structure, dynamics, and parental influences impact rates of obesity in children.