Project Title

Perception and Acceptability of Violence in Video Games, Movies, and News

Authors' Affiliations

Kaelyn Bishop1, Hannah Mathely1, Andy Asllani1, Joseph Barnet1, Dr. Andrea Clements1, Dr. Kent Norman2 1 Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN; 2 Department of Psychology, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

30

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Andrea Clements

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Psychology

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Undergraduate Student

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

It is imperative to know how violent material is perceived when presented over various media platforms and how acceptable these violent acts are in video games with different ESRB ratings. With the current debate surrounding the relationship between video games and violence, it is important to understand perception of violence in different media and acceptability of violent acts in video games of different ratings. This will allow a more accurate discussion on the impact of violent acts in video games as compared to other media which will help determine how to best proceed in eliminating causal factors of violence as well as influencing the production of new video games. It was expected that violent acts would be perceived as most violent in news, followed by movies, and least violent in video games. It was also expected that more violent acts would be seen as acceptable in video games rated mature rather than teen. Participants were gathered at University of Maryland from two classes and SONA. They were administered a survey to determine their video game usage and demographic information. Perception of violence in the news, movies, and video games was measured using a 9-point Likert Scale that ranged from 1-”harmless” to 9“horrifying.” Acceptability was measured by asking if particular violent acts were viewed as acceptable for teen ratings or mature ratings in video games. These acts ranged from mostly harmless to extremely brutal. In general, news was perceived as the most violent followed by movies then video games. The mean perceived violence in Video Games was 4.74 (SD=1.64), in Movies 5.05 (SD=1.68), and in News media 5.77 (SD=1.67). As expected, violent acts were better tolerated in games rated mature than games rated teen. The mean number of acts judged "unacceptable" (not marked as unacceptable) for Teen was 19.31 and for Mature it was only 8.81 (p<.001).

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Perception and Acceptability of Violence in Video Games, Movies, and News

Ballroom

It is imperative to know how violent material is perceived when presented over various media platforms and how acceptable these violent acts are in video games with different ESRB ratings. With the current debate surrounding the relationship between video games and violence, it is important to understand perception of violence in different media and acceptability of violent acts in video games of different ratings. This will allow a more accurate discussion on the impact of violent acts in video games as compared to other media which will help determine how to best proceed in eliminating causal factors of violence as well as influencing the production of new video games. It was expected that violent acts would be perceived as most violent in news, followed by movies, and least violent in video games. It was also expected that more violent acts would be seen as acceptable in video games rated mature rather than teen. Participants were gathered at University of Maryland from two classes and SONA. They were administered a survey to determine their video game usage and demographic information. Perception of violence in the news, movies, and video games was measured using a 9-point Likert Scale that ranged from 1-”harmless” to 9“horrifying.” Acceptability was measured by asking if particular violent acts were viewed as acceptable for teen ratings or mature ratings in video games. These acts ranged from mostly harmless to extremely brutal. In general, news was perceived as the most violent followed by movies then video games. The mean perceived violence in Video Games was 4.74 (SD=1.64), in Movies 5.05 (SD=1.68), and in News media 5.77 (SD=1.67). As expected, violent acts were better tolerated in games rated mature than games rated teen. The mean number of acts judged "unacceptable" (not marked as unacceptable) for Teen was 19.31 and for Mature it was only 8.81 (p<.001).