Project Title

Elizabethkingia Meningoseptica Bacteremia associated with Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug Abuser

Authors' Affiliations

Vindhya B. Sriramoju M.D.,1 Sowminya Arikapudi M.D.,1 Sarah Arif M.D.,1 Muazzam Ali M.D.,1 Suhitha Madhavaram M.D.,1 Michael Zhang M.D.,1 Abdul Hannan M.D.,1 Christopher T. Cook M.D.1 1.Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee.

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

120

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr.Christopher T. Cook

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Internal Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Elizabethkingia Meningoseptica (E. Meningoseptica) an oxidase-positive gram-negative aerobic rod.1-2 Although ubiquitous in nature and widely distributed in soil and water, it is not a part of normal human flora. Cases of outbreaks of meningitis in premature neonates or infants have been reported, however, very few cases have been reported in adults.3 Infection is primarily nosocomial, or hospital acquired and has been implicated in bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, endocarditis especially in immunocompromised individuals.2-4 We report a 29-year-old male with past medical history significant for intravenous drug abuse, hepatitis C, oxymorphone induced hemolytic uremic syndrome, who presented to hospital with altered mental status. On admission, patient was unresponsive to vocal commands, febrile (102.3 F), tachycardic and tachypneic. He had pinpoint pupils and diffuse petechiae. In addition, he had erythematous flat macular lesions on his palms and dorsum of hands as well as injection marks in left cubital fossa. Cardiac examination was significant for a grade III systolic murmur at apical region and diastolic murmur at left second intercostal space. Laboratory studies revealed thrombocytopenia (43,000m/microL), lactic acidosis (4.9mmol/L), serum creatinine (Cr) of 6.6 mg/dL, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 10 ml/min. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed large mobile vegetation on aortic valve measuring 3.6 x 0.72 cm. Patient’s presentation was consistent with infective endocarditis with the vegetation seen on TTE and patient’s physical findings. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain showed numerous small hemorrhagic infarcts, likely secondary to emboli from aortic valve vegetation. Patient required intubation for airway protection and started on hemodialysis. He was initially started on Meropenem and Vancomycin for infective endocarditis and later switched to Ciprofloxacin based on blood cultures and sensitivities which revealed methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug resistant E. Meningoseptica. Patient was transferred to long term care facility after acute care at the hospital. The increasing incidence of polymicrobial infective endocarditis and increasing resistance to antibiotic therapy pose challenges to the rapid assessment and treatment to mitigate the multi-organ involvement with septic emboli. Reports of pathogenicity associated with native valve endocarditis with this organism is scarce and exist primarily in a very few case reports and is resistant to many traditional antibiotics.5,6 E. Meningoseptica has shown antimicrobial susceptibility to the newer quinolones, rifampin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin with reasonable activity.7 Due to the unusual pattern of antibiotic resistance, early switching to appropriate antibiotics based on sensitivities is crucial for survival in patients with E. Meningoseptica.

References

1..Kim KK, Kim MK, Lim JH, Park HY, Lee ST. Transfer of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Chryseobacterium miricola to Elizabethkingia gen. nov. as Elizabethkingia meningoseptica comb. nov. and Elizabethkingia miricola comb. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol.2005 May;55(Pt 3):1287-93.

2:Shinha T, Ahuja R. Bacteremia due to Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. IDCases. 2015 Jan 17;2(1):13-5. doi: 10.1016/j.idcr.2015.01.002. eCollection 2015.

3..Jung SH, Lee B, Mirrakhimov AE, Hussain N. Septic shock caused by Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: a case report and review of literature. BMJ Case Rep. 2013 Apr 3;2013. pii: bcr2013009066. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2013-009066.

4.Ratnamani MS, Rao R. Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: Emerging nosocomial pathogen in bedside hemodialysis patients. Indian J Crit Care Med. 2013 Sep;17(5):304-7.

5.Bomb K, Arora A, Trehan N. Endocarditis due to Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Indian J Med Microbiol. 2007 Apr;25(2):161-2.

6.Yang J, Xue W, Yu X. Elizabethkingia meningosepticum endocarditis: A rare case and special therapy. Anatol J Cardiol. 2015 May;15(5):427-8.

7. Hsu MS, Liao CH, Huang YT, Liu CY, Yang CJ, Kao KL, Hsueh PR. Clinical features, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and outcomes of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica (Chryseobacterium meningosepticum) bacteremia at a medical center in Taiwan,1999-2006. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Oct;30(10):1271-8.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Elizabethkingia Meningoseptica Bacteremia associated with Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug Abuser

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Elizabethkingia Meningoseptica (E. Meningoseptica) an oxidase-positive gram-negative aerobic rod.1-2 Although ubiquitous in nature and widely distributed in soil and water, it is not a part of normal human flora. Cases of outbreaks of meningitis in premature neonates or infants have been reported, however, very few cases have been reported in adults.3 Infection is primarily nosocomial, or hospital acquired and has been implicated in bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, endocarditis especially in immunocompromised individuals.2-4 We report a 29-year-old male with past medical history significant for intravenous drug abuse, hepatitis C, oxymorphone induced hemolytic uremic syndrome, who presented to hospital with altered mental status. On admission, patient was unresponsive to vocal commands, febrile (102.3 F), tachycardic and tachypneic. He had pinpoint pupils and diffuse petechiae. In addition, he had erythematous flat macular lesions on his palms and dorsum of hands as well as injection marks in left cubital fossa. Cardiac examination was significant for a grade III systolic murmur at apical region and diastolic murmur at left second intercostal space. Laboratory studies revealed thrombocytopenia (43,000m/microL), lactic acidosis (4.9mmol/L), serum creatinine (Cr) of 6.6 mg/dL, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 10 ml/min. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed large mobile vegetation on aortic valve measuring 3.6 x 0.72 cm. Patient’s presentation was consistent with infective endocarditis with the vegetation seen on TTE and patient’s physical findings. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain showed numerous small hemorrhagic infarcts, likely secondary to emboli from aortic valve vegetation. Patient required intubation for airway protection and started on hemodialysis. He was initially started on Meropenem and Vancomycin for infective endocarditis and later switched to Ciprofloxacin based on blood cultures and sensitivities which revealed methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug resistant E. Meningoseptica. Patient was transferred to long term care facility after acute care at the hospital. The increasing incidence of polymicrobial infective endocarditis and increasing resistance to antibiotic therapy pose challenges to the rapid assessment and treatment to mitigate the multi-organ involvement with septic emboli. Reports of pathogenicity associated with native valve endocarditis with this organism is scarce and exist primarily in a very few case reports and is resistant to many traditional antibiotics.5,6 E. Meningoseptica has shown antimicrobial susceptibility to the newer quinolones, rifampin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin with reasonable activity.7 Due to the unusual pattern of antibiotic resistance, early switching to appropriate antibiotics based on sensitivities is crucial for survival in patients with E. Meningoseptica.

References

1..Kim KK, Kim MK, Lim JH, Park HY, Lee ST. Transfer of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Chryseobacterium miricola to Elizabethkingia gen. nov. as Elizabethkingia meningoseptica comb. nov. and Elizabethkingia miricola comb. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol.2005 May;55(Pt 3):1287-93.

2:Shinha T, Ahuja R. Bacteremia due to Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. IDCases. 2015 Jan 17;2(1):13-5. doi: 10.1016/j.idcr.2015.01.002. eCollection 2015.

3..Jung SH, Lee B, Mirrakhimov AE, Hussain N. Septic shock caused by Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: a case report and review of literature. BMJ Case Rep. 2013 Apr 3;2013. pii: bcr2013009066. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2013-009066.

4.Ratnamani MS, Rao R. Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: Emerging nosocomial pathogen in bedside hemodialysis patients. Indian J Crit Care Med. 2013 Sep;17(5):304-7.

5.Bomb K, Arora A, Trehan N. Endocarditis due to Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Indian J Med Microbiol. 2007 Apr;25(2):161-2.

6.Yang J, Xue W, Yu X. Elizabethkingia meningosepticum endocarditis: A rare case and special therapy. Anatol J Cardiol. 2015 May;15(5):427-8.

7. Hsu MS, Liao CH, Huang YT, Liu CY, Yang CJ, Kao KL, Hsueh PR. Clinical features, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and outcomes of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica (Chryseobacterium meningosepticum) bacteremia at a medical center in Taiwan,1999-2006. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Oct;30(10):1271-8.