Project Title

IMPROVING ANNUAL SCREENING FOR LUNG CANCER IN TARGETED ADULT POPULATIONS IN A RURAL FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY

Authors' Affiliations

Dr. Jason Hollis, Dr. Amr El-Aawar, Dr. Patricia Conner, and Dr. Amanda Stoltz, Department of Family Medicine, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

115

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Amanda Stoltz

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Family Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in men and women in the United States and the overall leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Due to this high prevalence, lung cancer screening is a critical procedure in all Family Medicine practices. However, screening is particularly important in rural Appalachian clinics, as this area experiences especially high rates of mortality due to lung cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening in adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. The goal of this project is assess readiness of clinical providers of the risks and benefits of lung cancer screening, to encourage screening when appropriate, and ultimately increase then number of LDCT annual screenings. Provider knowledge was assessing using a lung cancer screening knowledge and practice survey. Participants then attended an educational sessions that provided information on the importance of screening and when it is appropriate to administer LDCT. Finally, a second survey was administered, again to assess knowledge and practice. Data analysis is currently in process. A t-test will be executed to determine if there is a statistically significant difference between survey scores before and after the educational session. It is expected that the educational program will lead to increases in provider knowledge and more appropriate screenings. The results of this study have important ramifications for this area; because Appalachia has disproportionately high mortality due to lung cancer, it is imperative that the disease be identified as early as possible to ensure the most effective treatment. This project illustrates a method to increase screenings.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

IMPROVING ANNUAL SCREENING FOR LUNG CANCER IN TARGETED ADULT POPULATIONS IN A RURAL FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in men and women in the United States and the overall leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Due to this high prevalence, lung cancer screening is a critical procedure in all Family Medicine practices. However, screening is particularly important in rural Appalachian clinics, as this area experiences especially high rates of mortality due to lung cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening in adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. The goal of this project is assess readiness of clinical providers of the risks and benefits of lung cancer screening, to encourage screening when appropriate, and ultimately increase then number of LDCT annual screenings. Provider knowledge was assessing using a lung cancer screening knowledge and practice survey. Participants then attended an educational sessions that provided information on the importance of screening and when it is appropriate to administer LDCT. Finally, a second survey was administered, again to assess knowledge and practice. Data analysis is currently in process. A t-test will be executed to determine if there is a statistically significant difference between survey scores before and after the educational session. It is expected that the educational program will lead to increases in provider knowledge and more appropriate screenings. The results of this study have important ramifications for this area; because Appalachia has disproportionately high mortality due to lung cancer, it is imperative that the disease be identified as early as possible to ensure the most effective treatment. This project illustrates a method to increase screenings.