Project Title

Interprofessional Transitional Care Teams Reduce Medications Needed Post-Discharge

Authors' Affiliations

Kathleen McGuire White, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy Beth Bailey, PhD, East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine McKenzie Calhoun, PharmD, East Tennessee State University Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy Jesse Gilreath LCSW, ETSU Family Physicians of Kingsport

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

94

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

McKenzie Calhoun

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Pharmacy Student

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Purpose: The United State health system is fractionated: most patients travel from location to location to see various clinicians about specific aspects of their health. The poor outcomes and high cost we currently see in the United States health system has challenged clinicians to explore better processes. This study sought to identify the potential impact of utilizing interprofessional transitional care (IPTC) teams in the primary care setting following hospitalization. One outcome measured was the relationship between pharmacist’s participation and number of medications a patient was taking after their IPTC visit. Electronic Health Records were utilized to extract patient data and it was analyzed using SPSS and R programming to examine relationships between patient populations, disease states, number of medications, and pharmacist intervention. This study was conducted as part of an overall investigation into benefits of IPTC teams in Primary Care. We expect that the number of the medications to be reduced for patients that had a pharmacist involved in their transitional care visit.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Interprofessional Transitional Care Teams Reduce Medications Needed Post-Discharge

Ballroom

Purpose: The United State health system is fractionated: most patients travel from location to location to see various clinicians about specific aspects of their health. The poor outcomes and high cost we currently see in the United States health system has challenged clinicians to explore better processes. This study sought to identify the potential impact of utilizing interprofessional transitional care (IPTC) teams in the primary care setting following hospitalization. One outcome measured was the relationship between pharmacist’s participation and number of medications a patient was taking after their IPTC visit. Electronic Health Records were utilized to extract patient data and it was analyzed using SPSS and R programming to examine relationships between patient populations, disease states, number of medications, and pharmacist intervention. This study was conducted as part of an overall investigation into benefits of IPTC teams in Primary Care. We expect that the number of the medications to be reduced for patients that had a pharmacist involved in their transitional care visit.