Project Title

Crime in Tennessee: Differences in Perpetrator Gender and the Impact of Rurality

Authors' Affiliations

Rebecca Gilley, BS, Kelcey L. Puszkiewicz, MA, & Jill D. Stinson, PhD, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

102

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Jill D. Stinson, PhD

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Psychology

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

Researchers have long recognized the so-called “gender gap” in crime perpetration. The majority of crimes are committed by males, particularly with regard to more serious and violent crimes. However, little research examines these trends in rural areas. Less is known about social factors influencing rural crime, although some research suggests the gender gap is true across cultures and locations. The current study investigated male and female crime perpetration in Tennessee, emphasizing differences in rural versus nonrural counties. Data were obtained from the Tennessee Incident Based Reporting System from 2016. Using the 2013 Rural Urban Continuum Codes (RUCC), counties were categorized based on geographic size and proximity to metropolitan areas. Tennessee’s 95 counties were categorized as Rural (i.e., nonmetropolitan counties and completely rural areas with a population < 2,500; RUCC codes 4-9; n = 53), or Nonrural (i.e., metropolitan counties; RUCC codes 1-3; n = 42). Percentages of incidents committed by female versus male perpetrators, normalized for population estimates of each gender, were utilized. A 2 x 2 factorial ANOVA was used to examine the effects of sex and rurality on crime perpetration. The interaction term was not significant for total offenses or varied types of offenses. Offense types that implicate the presence of intimidation, violence, and fear (e.g., murder, assault, sexual offenses) had significant main effects for gender but not rurality. In contrast, fraud and theft offenses had significant main effects for both gender and rurality, with males and nonrural regions accounting for higher percentages of incidents. These findings contribute to the limited research on rural versus urban crime. Further research on social factors that influence male and female crime is needed specific to rural areas. Additional implications and future directions of research will be explored.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Crime in Tennessee: Differences in Perpetrator Gender and the Impact of Rurality

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Researchers have long recognized the so-called “gender gap” in crime perpetration. The majority of crimes are committed by males, particularly with regard to more serious and violent crimes. However, little research examines these trends in rural areas. Less is known about social factors influencing rural crime, although some research suggests the gender gap is true across cultures and locations. The current study investigated male and female crime perpetration in Tennessee, emphasizing differences in rural versus nonrural counties. Data were obtained from the Tennessee Incident Based Reporting System from 2016. Using the 2013 Rural Urban Continuum Codes (RUCC), counties were categorized based on geographic size and proximity to metropolitan areas. Tennessee’s 95 counties were categorized as Rural (i.e., nonmetropolitan counties and completely rural areas with a population < 2,500; RUCC codes 4-9; n = 53), or Nonrural (i.e., metropolitan counties; RUCC codes 1-3; n = 42). Percentages of incidents committed by female versus male perpetrators, normalized for population estimates of each gender, were utilized. A 2 x 2 factorial ANOVA was used to examine the effects of sex and rurality on crime perpetration. The interaction term was not significant for total offenses or varied types of offenses. Offense types that implicate the presence of intimidation, violence, and fear (e.g., murder, assault, sexual offenses) had significant main effects for gender but not rurality. In contrast, fraud and theft offenses had significant main effects for both gender and rurality, with males and nonrural regions accounting for higher percentages of incidents. These findings contribute to the limited research on rural versus urban crime. Further research on social factors that influence male and female crime is needed specific to rural areas. Additional implications and future directions of research will be explored.