Project Title

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES, MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES, AND POLYPHARMACY AMONG PSYCHIATRIC INPATIENTS IN SECURE FORENSIC CARE

Authors' Affiliations

Carrie C. LeMay, MS1, Jill D. Stinson, PhD1, and Megan Quinn, DrPH2. 1Dept. of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN; 2College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

104

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Jill Stinson

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Psychology

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

Persons exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are at increased risk of developing long-term negative health consequences. ACEs have a cumulative negative impact on mental health outcomes in particular. Evidence suggests that those in forensic psychiatric settings are disproportionally exposed to ACEs, lending to potentially greater complexity in the relationship between ACEs, psychiatric comorbidity, and behavioral problems. Additionally, within this population a common intervention for mental health symptomology includes pharmacology, particularly as health issues compound. As a medication regimen becomes more complex, the risk for negative consequences – including drug interactions, side effects, and even death – increases.

Limited empirical research describing associations between ACEs, mental health outcomes, and polypharmacy is available. Furthermore, no published studies to date have examined these relationships in forensic inpatient mental health populations, despite the evidence that these populations are disproportionately exposed to maltreatment and household dysfunction in childhood, frequently have higher rates of physical and mental health problems, and are usually treated with multiple forms of medications in response to health and behavioral needs. To address gaps in existing research, the relationship between ACEs, mental health outcomes, and prescription practices will be examined within a forensic inpatient sample.

The current study seeks to investigate the impact of ACEs on mental health outcomes and the relationship to polypharmacy practices within a forensic psychiatric setting. A total of 182 patients residing in a secure forensic psychiatric hospital were selected. The sample is predominantly male (80.8%, n=147) and majority Caucasian (55.5%, n=101) or African American (40.1%, n=73), with a mean age of 43.5 (SD=13.2). Participants range from persons with at least one mental health disorder (100%, n=182) to persons with at least one chronic illness (74.5%, n=132).

It is expected that greater experiences of childhood maltreatment and household dysfunction will result in greater negative mental health outcomes and associated behaviors. This relationship is expected to contribute to polypharmacy practices among prescribing physicians. Because high rates of polypharmacy yield a potential for increased aversive health outcomes, understanding the association between ACEs and other predictive factors and polypharmacy practice has valuable implications for the treatment and rehabilitation of persons in forensic mental health settings.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES, MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES, AND POLYPHARMACY AMONG PSYCHIATRIC INPATIENTS IN SECURE FORENSIC CARE

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Persons exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are at increased risk of developing long-term negative health consequences. ACEs have a cumulative negative impact on mental health outcomes in particular. Evidence suggests that those in forensic psychiatric settings are disproportionally exposed to ACEs, lending to potentially greater complexity in the relationship between ACEs, psychiatric comorbidity, and behavioral problems. Additionally, within this population a common intervention for mental health symptomology includes pharmacology, particularly as health issues compound. As a medication regimen becomes more complex, the risk for negative consequences – including drug interactions, side effects, and even death – increases.

Limited empirical research describing associations between ACEs, mental health outcomes, and polypharmacy is available. Furthermore, no published studies to date have examined these relationships in forensic inpatient mental health populations, despite the evidence that these populations are disproportionately exposed to maltreatment and household dysfunction in childhood, frequently have higher rates of physical and mental health problems, and are usually treated with multiple forms of medications in response to health and behavioral needs. To address gaps in existing research, the relationship between ACEs, mental health outcomes, and prescription practices will be examined within a forensic inpatient sample.

The current study seeks to investigate the impact of ACEs on mental health outcomes and the relationship to polypharmacy practices within a forensic psychiatric setting. A total of 182 patients residing in a secure forensic psychiatric hospital were selected. The sample is predominantly male (80.8%, n=147) and majority Caucasian (55.5%, n=101) or African American (40.1%, n=73), with a mean age of 43.5 (SD=13.2). Participants range from persons with at least one mental health disorder (100%, n=182) to persons with at least one chronic illness (74.5%, n=132).

It is expected that greater experiences of childhood maltreatment and household dysfunction will result in greater negative mental health outcomes and associated behaviors. This relationship is expected to contribute to polypharmacy practices among prescribing physicians. Because high rates of polypharmacy yield a potential for increased aversive health outcomes, understanding the association between ACEs and other predictive factors and polypharmacy practice has valuable implications for the treatment and rehabilitation of persons in forensic mental health settings.