Project Title

Treatment of CMV Vitritis in a Preterm Newborn

Authors' Affiliations

Remil Simon^1, Darshan Shah^1, Peter Blosser^1, Demetrio Macariola^1, Jeffrey Carlsen^2 1.Department of Pediatrics, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 2.Johnson City Eye Clinic, Johnson City, TN

Location

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

142

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Darshan Shah

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Pediatrics

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Student

Project's Category

Biomedical Case Study

Abstract Text

Title: Treatment of CMV Vitritis in a Preterm Newborn

Author’s Section: Remil Simon1, Darshan Shah1, Peter Blosser1, Demetrio Macariola1, Jeffrey Carlsen2

1.Department of Pediatrics, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

2.Johnson City Eye Clinic, Johnson City, TN

Body: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the neonate is an infrequent occurrence in the developing world, and observing the symptoms of ocular CMV infection such as vitritis is rare. Treating CMV infection promptly is necessary to prevent mortality and potential neurological deficits including blindness and hearing loss. We encountered a preterm infant presenting with CMV sepsis immediately after birth. Our question was: will the current standard of treatment for CMV sepsis prevent CMV ocular infection? With our method of treatment, we followed the current standard of treatment for CMV infection by administering intravenous Gancyclovir for 6 weeks and oral Valgancyclovir for 6 months. Despite using the standard treatment to prevent neurological sequelae, the patient developed CMV vitritis and retinitis bilaterally. Although the treatment did not prevent CMV ocular infection, the severity of CMV retinitis and vitritis improved with treatment, and full resolution of vitritis was noted by day of life 61.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Treatment of CMV Vitritis in a Preterm Newborn

Clinch Mtn. Room 215

Title: Treatment of CMV Vitritis in a Preterm Newborn

Author’s Section: Remil Simon1, Darshan Shah1, Peter Blosser1, Demetrio Macariola1, Jeffrey Carlsen2

1.Department of Pediatrics, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

2.Johnson City Eye Clinic, Johnson City, TN

Body: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the neonate is an infrequent occurrence in the developing world, and observing the symptoms of ocular CMV infection such as vitritis is rare. Treating CMV infection promptly is necessary to prevent mortality and potential neurological deficits including blindness and hearing loss. We encountered a preterm infant presenting with CMV sepsis immediately after birth. Our question was: will the current standard of treatment for CMV sepsis prevent CMV ocular infection? With our method of treatment, we followed the current standard of treatment for CMV infection by administering intravenous Gancyclovir for 6 weeks and oral Valgancyclovir for 6 months. Despite using the standard treatment to prevent neurological sequelae, the patient developed CMV vitritis and retinitis bilaterally. Although the treatment did not prevent CMV ocular infection, the severity of CMV retinitis and vitritis improved with treatment, and full resolution of vitritis was noted by day of life 61.