Project Title

OUTPATIENT EVALUATION & MANAGEMENT BILLING AND CODING: DEVELOPMENT OF ENDURING CURRICULUM FOR PGY1 RESIDENT EDUCATION IN A RURAL FAMILY MEDICINE PRACTICE

Authors' Affiliations

Dr. Cortney Farmer, Dr. Havya Dave, Dr. Zachary Sumpter, Dr. Patricia Conner, and Dr. Amanda Stoltz, Department of Family Medicine, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.

Location

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

116

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Amanda Stoltz

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Family Medicine

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Medical Resident or Clinical Fellow

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Accurate Evaluation and Management (E&M) billing and coding is an essential skill for medical clinicians. Consequences of incorrect E&M billing and coding include delayed patient treatment, delayed reimbursements from third party payers, and even charges of insurance fraud. The accuracy of billing and coding is especially salient in practices whose patient population is covered primarily by Medicare/Medicaid, as is the case in many Northeast Tennessee clinics. Despite the importance of accurate E&M billing and coding, recently graduated physicians moving into their first year of residency are often under-informed regarding proper billing and coding. Much of their knowledge about the process is picked up piecemeal over the course of their residency. The purpose of this study is to educate incoming post-graduate year one (PGY1) medical residents on the E&M billing and coding system for a rural Family Medicine clinic. During their first month as PGY1 resident physicians, participants were given a survey to assess their knowledge of E&M billing and coding for outpatient encounters. Participants then attended an educational session on this topic and received handouts that they could reference in the future. The participants were then surveyed again. Data analysis is currently underway. A repeated measure t-test will be utilized to determine if the educational session and informational handouts led to a statistically significant increase in PGY1 resident knowledge of E&M billing and coding. It is expected that participants will show significant knowledge gains as a result of the educational training. This research has important implications for medical resident training, particularly in rural practices that treat large populations covered by Medicare/Medicaid.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

OUTPATIENT EVALUATION & MANAGEMENT BILLING AND CODING: DEVELOPMENT OF ENDURING CURRICULUM FOR PGY1 RESIDENT EDUCATION IN A RURAL FAMILY MEDICINE PRACTICE

WhiteTop Mountain Room 225

Accurate Evaluation and Management (E&M) billing and coding is an essential skill for medical clinicians. Consequences of incorrect E&M billing and coding include delayed patient treatment, delayed reimbursements from third party payers, and even charges of insurance fraud. The accuracy of billing and coding is especially salient in practices whose patient population is covered primarily by Medicare/Medicaid, as is the case in many Northeast Tennessee clinics. Despite the importance of accurate E&M billing and coding, recently graduated physicians moving into their first year of residency are often under-informed regarding proper billing and coding. Much of their knowledge about the process is picked up piecemeal over the course of their residency. The purpose of this study is to educate incoming post-graduate year one (PGY1) medical residents on the E&M billing and coding system for a rural Family Medicine clinic. During their first month as PGY1 resident physicians, participants were given a survey to assess their knowledge of E&M billing and coding for outpatient encounters. Participants then attended an educational session on this topic and received handouts that they could reference in the future. The participants were then surveyed again. Data analysis is currently underway. A repeated measure t-test will be utilized to determine if the educational session and informational handouts led to a statistically significant increase in PGY1 resident knowledge of E&M billing and coding. It is expected that participants will show significant knowledge gains as a result of the educational training. This research has important implications for medical resident training, particularly in rural practices that treat large populations covered by Medicare/Medicaid.