Project Title

Biochemical Characterization of Tomato Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

Authors' Affiliations

Sujan Shrestha and Aruna Kilaru, Department of Biological Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37604

Location

BAYS MTN. ROOM 125

Start Date

4-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 1:15 PM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Aruna Kilaru

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Biological Science

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Natural Sciences

Abstract Text

Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH), a serine hydrolase family protein, hydrolyzes N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) by cleaving the amide bond linking the acyl group with ethanolamine to produce free fatty acids. Highly conserved ‘Amidase Signature (AS)’ sequence rich in serine, glycine and alanine residues characterize the protein. FAAH plays role in various physiological processes by regulating NAE levels, such as seedling growth, defense response. Understanding of the role of NAEs and FAAH has been however, limited to model plant Arabidopsis. Here, with interest to understand the role of FAAH in modulating NAE composition, tomato was chosen as a model system. Recently, SlFAAH1, an ortholog of AtFAAH1 was identified in tomato and was successfully expressed in prokaryotic expression system. Protein assay with lysate of cells expressing recombinant putative SlFAAH1 showed the ability to hydrolyze a polyunsaturated NAE (NAE20:4). Currently, additional assays are being carried out to determine optimal pH, temp, substrate specificity and associated enzyme kinetics. In parallel, the effect of exogenous NAEs on SlFAAH1 expression levels and during seedling development is being evaluated. Together, this study is expected to not only characterize a protein in tomato but also determine its role in mediating NAE metabolism and seedling development, and further allows for comparison with Arabidopsis and mammalian FAAH to determine its functional conservation.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 1:00 PM Apr 4th, 1:15 PM

Biochemical Characterization of Tomato Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

BAYS MTN. ROOM 125

Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH), a serine hydrolase family protein, hydrolyzes N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) by cleaving the amide bond linking the acyl group with ethanolamine to produce free fatty acids. Highly conserved ‘Amidase Signature (AS)’ sequence rich in serine, glycine and alanine residues characterize the protein. FAAH plays role in various physiological processes by regulating NAE levels, such as seedling growth, defense response. Understanding of the role of NAEs and FAAH has been however, limited to model plant Arabidopsis. Here, with interest to understand the role of FAAH in modulating NAE composition, tomato was chosen as a model system. Recently, SlFAAH1, an ortholog of AtFAAH1 was identified in tomato and was successfully expressed in prokaryotic expression system. Protein assay with lysate of cells expressing recombinant putative SlFAAH1 showed the ability to hydrolyze a polyunsaturated NAE (NAE20:4). Currently, additional assays are being carried out to determine optimal pH, temp, substrate specificity and associated enzyme kinetics. In parallel, the effect of exogenous NAEs on SlFAAH1 expression levels and during seedling development is being evaluated. Together, this study is expected to not only characterize a protein in tomato but also determine its role in mediating NAE metabolism and seedling development, and further allows for comparison with Arabidopsis and mammalian FAAH to determine its functional conservation.