Project Title

Immobilization of Gold Nanoparticles on Nitrided Carbon Fiber Ultramicroelectrodes by Direct Reduction as a Platform for Measuring Electrocatalytic Properties.

Authors' Affiliations

George Affadu-Danful, Chemistry Department, College of Arts and Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee. Theophilus Neequaye, Chemistry Department, College of Arts and Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee. Gregory W. Bishop, Chemistry Department, College of Arts and Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee.

Location

BAYS MTN. ROOM 125

Start Date

4-4-2018 10:40 AM

End Date

4-4-2018 10:55 AM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Gregory W. Bishop

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Chemistry Department

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Natural Sciences

Abstract Text

Due to their small size and large surface area-to-volume ratios, nanoparticles (particles with limiting dimensions smaller than 100 nm) have been widely applied as catalysts. Metal nanoparticles are typically produced in suspensions from metal ion precursors, reducing agents, and organic ligands called capping agents. Capping agents help prevent particle agglomeration, fix nanoparticle size, and promote monodispersity. However, capping agents also affect the morphology and the physico-chemical surface properties of nanoparticles, which can influence catalytic properties in unpredictable ways. While there have been extensive studies focused on examining the relationship between nanoparticle size, shape, composition and catalytic activity, relatively few have investigated the effects of capping agent properties on catalysis, and most studies involving nanoparticle catalysts have been conducted on collections, ensembles, or arrays of particles rather than single nanoparticles. Results obtained for systems composed of multiple nanoparticles dispersed on solid surfaces can be difficult to interpret due to variations in particle loading and interparticle distance, which are often challenging or impossible to control and characterize. The complexity of these unavoidable experimental variables may explain some of the seemingly inconsistent conclusions that have been drawn between nanoparticle properties and catalytic activity in recent reports. Single nanoparticle studies should help overcome limitations associated with investigations based on collections of nanoparticles by helping uncover direct relationships between nanoparticle size, surface properties, and catalytic activity that are unobscured by complex factors such as interparticle distance and particle loading. In this work, we aim to use nitrided carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes to examine electrocatalytic properties of bare (uncapped) and capped gold nanoparticles at the single nanoparticle level.

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Apr 4th, 10:40 AM Apr 4th, 10:55 AM

Immobilization of Gold Nanoparticles on Nitrided Carbon Fiber Ultramicroelectrodes by Direct Reduction as a Platform for Measuring Electrocatalytic Properties.

BAYS MTN. ROOM 125

Due to their small size and large surface area-to-volume ratios, nanoparticles (particles with limiting dimensions smaller than 100 nm) have been widely applied as catalysts. Metal nanoparticles are typically produced in suspensions from metal ion precursors, reducing agents, and organic ligands called capping agents. Capping agents help prevent particle agglomeration, fix nanoparticle size, and promote monodispersity. However, capping agents also affect the morphology and the physico-chemical surface properties of nanoparticles, which can influence catalytic properties in unpredictable ways. While there have been extensive studies focused on examining the relationship between nanoparticle size, shape, composition and catalytic activity, relatively few have investigated the effects of capping agent properties on catalysis, and most studies involving nanoparticle catalysts have been conducted on collections, ensembles, or arrays of particles rather than single nanoparticles. Results obtained for systems composed of multiple nanoparticles dispersed on solid surfaces can be difficult to interpret due to variations in particle loading and interparticle distance, which are often challenging or impossible to control and characterize. The complexity of these unavoidable experimental variables may explain some of the seemingly inconsistent conclusions that have been drawn between nanoparticle properties and catalytic activity in recent reports. Single nanoparticle studies should help overcome limitations associated with investigations based on collections of nanoparticles by helping uncover direct relationships between nanoparticle size, surface properties, and catalytic activity that are unobscured by complex factors such as interparticle distance and particle loading. In this work, we aim to use nitrided carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes to examine electrocatalytic properties of bare (uncapped) and capped gold nanoparticles at the single nanoparticle level.