Authors' Affiliations

1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

4-5-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2018 12:00 PM

Poster Number

89

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Shimin Zheng

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614

Type

Poster: Competitive

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Master’s

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Background: Unlike other non-hepatitis c viral infection, hepatitis c viral infection is a non-vaccine preventable disease. Thus, effective treatment is an important part in the prevention of complication of chronic hepatitis c infection. The viral genotype plays a significant role in the choice of treatment regimen.

Aim: the purpose of this study is to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis c viral infection and the distribution of viral genotype in the US population.

Methods: Diagnosis of Hepatitis C viral infection was made by assaying the blood specimen collected from the study participants using Ampiclor monitor (Roche Diagnostic System, Inc Branchburg NJ), and genotype determined from the NS5b region. The data is from NHANSE 2006-2016. SAS v 9.4 software was used to perform the analysis.

Results: Of the 356 participants (2006-2016) who tested positive to Hepatitis C virus-RNA, 205 persons had genotype 1a, 1b (n=66), other forms of genotype 1 (n=1), genotype 2(n=41), genotype 3 (n=30), genotype 4 (n=1), genotype 6(n=1), undetermined genotype (n=8). Based on weighted analysis of person infected with genotype 1, 2, 3; genotype 1 was highest across all ages and gender (78.2%). Of 271 participants infected with genotype 1, there were 5.09% Mexican Americans, 3.94% other Hispanics, 56.58% non-Hispanic whites, 28.74% non-Hispanic black, and 5.65% other races including multiracial population.

Subjects aged 50 years or above was 27.7% less likely being infected with HCV genotype 1 vs 2 and 3, compared with younger individuals (adjusted Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) (aOR): 0.72 (0.72-0.73)). Non-Hispanic black were about 13 times (aOR: 13.1 (13.0-13.2)) as likely to be infected with genotype 1 vs 2 and 3 as non-Hispanic white.

Conclusion: Hepatitis C virus genotype 1 is predominant among those infected with hepatitis c virus in the US population. Improvement in therapy targeting genotype 1 is essential to reduce the burden and complication of chronic hepatitis C in the United States.

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Apr 5th, 8:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

The distribution of hepatitis c virus genotypes in US population. Data from NHANES 2006-2016

Ballroom

Background: Unlike other non-hepatitis c viral infection, hepatitis c viral infection is a non-vaccine preventable disease. Thus, effective treatment is an important part in the prevention of complication of chronic hepatitis c infection. The viral genotype plays a significant role in the choice of treatment regimen.

Aim: the purpose of this study is to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis c viral infection and the distribution of viral genotype in the US population.

Methods: Diagnosis of Hepatitis C viral infection was made by assaying the blood specimen collected from the study participants using Ampiclor monitor (Roche Diagnostic System, Inc Branchburg NJ), and genotype determined from the NS5b region. The data is from NHANSE 2006-2016. SAS v 9.4 software was used to perform the analysis.

Results: Of the 356 participants (2006-2016) who tested positive to Hepatitis C virus-RNA, 205 persons had genotype 1a, 1b (n=66), other forms of genotype 1 (n=1), genotype 2(n=41), genotype 3 (n=30), genotype 4 (n=1), genotype 6(n=1), undetermined genotype (n=8). Based on weighted analysis of person infected with genotype 1, 2, 3; genotype 1 was highest across all ages and gender (78.2%). Of 271 participants infected with genotype 1, there were 5.09% Mexican Americans, 3.94% other Hispanics, 56.58% non-Hispanic whites, 28.74% non-Hispanic black, and 5.65% other races including multiracial population.

Subjects aged 50 years or above was 27.7% less likely being infected with HCV genotype 1 vs 2 and 3, compared with younger individuals (adjusted Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) (aOR): 0.72 (0.72-0.73)). Non-Hispanic black were about 13 times (aOR: 13.1 (13.0-13.2)) as likely to be infected with genotype 1 vs 2 and 3 as non-Hispanic white.

Conclusion: Hepatitis C virus genotype 1 is predominant among those infected with hepatitis c virus in the US population. Improvement in therapy targeting genotype 1 is essential to reduce the burden and complication of chronic hepatitis C in the United States.