Project Title

Prevalence of metabolic conditions by BMI category and undiagnosed status in the U.S Adults

Authors' Affiliations

Ifeoma Ozodiegwu Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, ETSU Youngke Lu Department of Health Science, College of Public Health, ETSU Kesheng Wang Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, ETSU Ying Liu Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, ETSU

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:20 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:35 PM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Ying Liu

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Biomedical and Health Sciences

Abstract Text

Introduction

Obesity is a risk factor for abnormal metabolic conditions including hypertension, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The varying prevalence patterns of these metabolic conditions stratified by body mass index (BMI) among individuals lacking awareness of their disease status is poorly explored.

Methods

The study data was from the U.S. CDC 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and included participants aged ≥20 years who had completed examinations for blood pressure and BMI, laboratory tests for blood sugar and cholesterol, and interviews for demographics and other related health issues. Individuals lacking a formal diagnosis from a health professional were referred to as undiagnosed. The weighted prevalence and its 95% confidence interval (CI) for total T2D, hypertension, and high cholesterol and total abnormal metabolic items by BMI within each subgroup were calculated. Similar calculations were also applied to undiagnosed participants. By treating BMI < 25 as the reference, the proportional test was used to identify if significant prevalence existed in two comparisons:overweight vs. BMI < 25 and obese vs. BMI < 25. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant

Results and Conclusions

The overall weighted prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and overall abnormal metabolic conditions were 16.1%, 60.3%, 57.5% and 76.3%, respectively while the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and abnormal metabolic condition are 8.8%, 11.3%, 16.8% and 30.2%, respectively. A higher prevalence of T2D existed in individuals with BMI25≤BMI≤30 among black adults (18.4% vs. 16.2%). Similar differences were also observed among undiagnosed black participants with BMI < 25 (12.1% vs. 7.5%). The prevalence of total and undiagnosed hypertension increased with BMI although prevalence was lower in the undiagnosed population.

Our study findings reveal that while a higher proportion of obese individuals have chronic conditions, a large proportion of normal weight individuals are similarly burdened. The prevalence estimates of individuals with at least one undiagnosed abnormal metabolic condition indicates a need for expanded screening campaigns. Additionally, the higher prevalence of T2D among normal weight warrants further research to identify potential drivers. Although efforts to manage and control these conditions must continue to have a heightened focus on obese individuals, it must also broaden its scope to target normal weight individuals and develop strategies to decrease the proportion of U.S adults without awareness of their disease status.

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Apr 4th, 3:20 PM Apr 4th, 3:35 PM

Prevalence of metabolic conditions by BMI category and undiagnosed status in the U.S Adults

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Introduction

Obesity is a risk factor for abnormal metabolic conditions including hypertension, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The varying prevalence patterns of these metabolic conditions stratified by body mass index (BMI) among individuals lacking awareness of their disease status is poorly explored.

Methods

The study data was from the U.S. CDC 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and included participants aged ≥20 years who had completed examinations for blood pressure and BMI, laboratory tests for blood sugar and cholesterol, and interviews for demographics and other related health issues. Individuals lacking a formal diagnosis from a health professional were referred to as undiagnosed. The weighted prevalence and its 95% confidence interval (CI) for total T2D, hypertension, and high cholesterol and total abnormal metabolic items by BMI within each subgroup were calculated. Similar calculations were also applied to undiagnosed participants. By treating BMI < 25 as the reference, the proportional test was used to identify if significant prevalence existed in two comparisons:overweight vs. BMI < 25 and obese vs. BMI < 25. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant

Results and Conclusions

The overall weighted prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and overall abnormal metabolic conditions were 16.1%, 60.3%, 57.5% and 76.3%, respectively while the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and abnormal metabolic condition are 8.8%, 11.3%, 16.8% and 30.2%, respectively. A higher prevalence of T2D existed in individuals with BMI25≤BMI≤30 among black adults (18.4% vs. 16.2%). Similar differences were also observed among undiagnosed black participants with BMI < 25 (12.1% vs. 7.5%). The prevalence of total and undiagnosed hypertension increased with BMI although prevalence was lower in the undiagnosed population.

Our study findings reveal that while a higher proportion of obese individuals have chronic conditions, a large proportion of normal weight individuals are similarly burdened. The prevalence estimates of individuals with at least one undiagnosed abnormal metabolic condition indicates a need for expanded screening campaigns. Additionally, the higher prevalence of T2D among normal weight warrants further research to identify potential drivers. Although efforts to manage and control these conditions must continue to have a heightened focus on obese individuals, it must also broaden its scope to target normal weight individuals and develop strategies to decrease the proportion of U.S adults without awareness of their disease status.