Project Title

Thinking into the Future: Motivational Consequences of Time Perspective

Authors' Affiliations

Parker A. Dreves, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Location

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Start Date

4-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2018 10:15 AM

Name of Project's Faculty Sponsor

Ginette Blackhart

Faculty Sponsor's Department

Psychology

Type

Oral Presentation

Classification of First Author

Graduate Student-Doctoral

Project's Category

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract Text

Time perspective refers to an individual’s cognitive orientation toward the past, present or future. Time perspective has been theorized to have implications for motivation, goal setting, and decision-making. This research examines the role of time perspective in determining whether individuals are primarily focused on short-term or long-term goals. Three studies were conducted to show that time perspective adjusts the incentive value of long-term goals and thus influences self-control. Study 1 is a pilot study confirming the expected correlations between time perspective, goal strength, and self-control. Study 2 extends Study 1 by examining additional dimensions of the future time perspective as well as testing indirect effects. Study 3 shows that manipulating time perspective produces changes in self-control as measured by a delay of gratification test. The results suggest that time perspective influences the content of individuals’ goals and thus self-control.

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Apr 4th, 10:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:15 AM

Thinking into the Future: Motivational Consequences of Time Perspective

AUDITORIUM ROOM 137B

Time perspective refers to an individual’s cognitive orientation toward the past, present or future. Time perspective has been theorized to have implications for motivation, goal setting, and decision-making. This research examines the role of time perspective in determining whether individuals are primarily focused on short-term or long-term goals. Three studies were conducted to show that time perspective adjusts the incentive value of long-term goals and thus influences self-control. Study 1 is a pilot study confirming the expected correlations between time perspective, goal strength, and self-control. Study 2 extends Study 1 by examining additional dimensions of the future time perspective as well as testing indirect effects. Study 3 shows that manipulating time perspective produces changes in self-control as measured by a delay of gratification test. The results suggest that time perspective influences the content of individuals’ goals and thus self-control.